Tag: Wardrobe Review

Bond Wardrobe Review 12: For Your Eyes Only (1981)

50
After the extravagance of the 1970s, James Bond was refreshed in a 'down-to-earth' and 'back-to-basics' approach for the 1980s. The absurd original stories were put on hold in favour of a return to Ian Fleming's short story collection For Your Eyes Only. The tone was once again that of a Cold War thriller, and James Bond's style had to revert to tradition to follow.

Bond Wardrobe Review 11: Moonraker (1979)

42
Moonraker continues the overly trendy 1970s styles from The Spy Who Loved Me but frames them in more classic ways. Angelo Roma continued making the suits with the same wide lapels and wide flared trousers yet superb fit, and Frank Foster again made the shirts with long point collars and Lapidus tab cuffs.

Bond Wardrobe Review 10: The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

31
The 1970s takes on new meaning with Roger Moore's wardrobe in The Spy Who Loved Me. The film's style is defined by wide lapels, gargantuan flared trousers, large shirt collars and Ted Lapidus-inspired tabbed shirt cuffs. Moore left his former tailor Cyril Castle behind ...

Bond Wardrobe Review 9: The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)

42
The Man with the Golden Gun's wardrobe review immediately follows Live and Let Die's because the wardrobes go hand-in-hand. Cyril Castle's second and final turn at tailoring James Bond ties up some loose ends from the previous film in the form of a black tie look.

Bond Wardrobe Review 8: Live and Let Die (1973)

24
Drinking bourbon instead of a vodka martini and smoking cigars instead of cigarettes famously differentiated Roger Moore’s first appearance as James Bond in Live and Let Die from his that of his two predecessors, but his sartorial style was different from the previous Bonds’ styles as well.

Bond Wardrobe Review 7: Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

44
Diamonds Are Forever presents the largest tailored wardrobe of the entire Bond series. Despite the primary Las Vegas location, Bond maintains his quintessentially dressed-up look there and almost

Bond Wardrobe Review 6: On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969)

24
A Fresh Look for the Other Fella. On Her Majesty's Secret Service marks the not only the first instance in the James Bond series of a new Bond actor but also a new tailor for Bond. George Lazenby replaced Sean Connery and Dimi Major replaced Anthony Sinclair.

Bond Wardrobe Review 5: You Only Live Twice (1967)

34
A rather odd mixture of styles, but Bond refuses to go entirely Japanese. You Only Live Twice breaks away from the past wardrobe successes for less James Bond style and more borrowed clothes and disguises. While there are a few iconic looks that remind us that Sean Connery is still James Bond, many outfits miss the mark.