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  • Matt Spaiser 5 December 2022 at 22:58 on The Top (00)7 Tailored Outfits of a Winter Bond WardrobeWhat you're looking for is the Arthur Harrison '2080' Worsted Flannel. As far as I know, it's the ultimate worsted flannel. Arthur Harrison is one Taylor & Lodge's brands, and you can see it here: https://www.taylorandlodge.com/shop-iconic/flannel
  • Matt Spaiser 5 December 2022 at 22:52 on The Top (00)7 Tailored Outfits of a Winter Bond WardrobeThe old-fashioned serge is a beautiful cloth, and I agree that it is perfect for winter. What made it special was that the yarns in one direction are worsted and in the other direction they are woollen. That gives it those wonderful properties you speak of. The blue suit in From Russia with Love could possibly be this old-fashioned serge rather than worsted flannel, but as you say they are difficult to tell apart by sight.
  • Matt Spaiser 5 December 2022 at 22:45 on A Wardrobe of Frank Foster ShirtsHi Matthew, you can read more about that shirt in these two articles: https://www.bondsuits.com/douglas-hayward-1980s-charcoal-three-piece-suit-for-your-eyes-only/ https://www.bondsuits.com/white-collar-and-cuffs/
  • Travers Alvirez 5 December 2022 at 22:02 on The Top (00)7 Tailored Outfits of a Winter Bond WardrobeIf I have a Christmas gift request, it would be for one day, some mill somewhere in England will produce worsted flannels 15oz and heavier. I want to like worsted flannels, but they are always 10 oz or lighter.
  • Taka 5 December 2022 at 20:01 on The Top (00)7 Tailored Outfits of a Winter Bond WardrobeStrangely enough, James Bond rarely wears a serge suit in the movies, but I think an 'old-fashioned' well-made serge would also work well for a midwinter suit. Specifically, being heavyweight. A minimum of 14 to 18 oz is good. 『Old-fashioned serge』 often have fluff. It can also be found in the heavyweight ones mentioned above. From a distance, it looks just like Worsted Flannel (Saxony). This fluff is probably important. The fuzzy serge has a heat retention similar to that of flannel. There are many things called Worsted Flannel that are out in the world that cannot be distinguished from serge just by looking at them. That means you can see the twill clearly. There was also a bunch of books from a few years back named 『Worsted』. It has already been discontinued, but it was released by Fox Brothers. Included in this bunchbook was what they called the 『Original Serge』. It was named Serge, but in their classification it was 『worsted flannel』. It's really complicated and still puzzles me to this day. Perhaps by nature, the line between worsted flannel and old-fashioned serge is a very blurry one. I said they were hard to tell apart by sight. However, there may be a big difference in how to make it on the side of the creator. Now, this is what anyone in a flannel suit would face, whether it's Worsted or Woolen. That means the crease line disappears quickly. That is also the taste and the charm of flannel. However, for many ordinary businessmen who need a suit, it will make them look slovenly. It is very likely that it will be seen as a fatal flaw. In the past, the image quality was poor, and even the colors were unclear. Therefore, this blurry atmosphere of flannel should not have been directly linked to a slovenly atmosphere. However, in today's movies, where the image quality has improved dramatically, you can clearly see Bond wearing pants with flannel crease lines. James Bond is the epitome of a sophisticated man. Once the uniform of the middle class, the flannel might not feel sophisticated to most people who aren't into fashion. I think this is one of the reasons why James Bond stopped wearing the old-fashioned woolen flannel suit. Combined with its durability, I think this is the reason why the number of flannel suits has decreased dramatically. For these reasons, I think 『Old Fashioned Serge』 is worth considering as an alternative to flannel. The crease lines are kept clean and require less ironing. The result is a sleek, clean look. And 『Old-fashioned serge』gives a flannel-like warmth and a seasonal look. Serge durability is much better than flannel. I see! That's why it is used in military uniforms. A well-tailored made-to-order suit does not make you feel the weight of the cloth, so I would like everyone to try it. But old-fashioned woolen flannel has a good vibe that you just can't get anywhere else. My story is only talking as a modern alternative.
  • Sinclair 5 December 2022 at 17:16 on The Top (00)7 Tailored Outfits of a Winter Bond WardrobeYes, but what I meant was that I kind of liked to idea of keeping the whole outfit in different shades of blue.
  • Rod+The+Mod 5 December 2022 at 16:58 on The Top (00)7 Tailored Outfits of a Winter Bond WardrobeOpportunities to get Bond into a dinner jacket are going to be harder and harder as we move into the future but he managed three in DAF. For that reason, although I’d put both film and wardrobe near the bottom of my personal ranking of the cannon, I can look past the break with tradition this time as the blue shirt is worn for a romantic dinner with Tiffany and aside from the chef and sommelier perhaps no-one else would have even witnessed this mini faux pas. I can remember a period when blood red evening shirts worn with dinner jackets enjoyed a thankfully brief moment in the seventies. With that in mind we can be thankful that Bond’s shirts have almost always followed a more classic tradition.
  • Matthew Buzzell 5 December 2022 at 16:57 on A Wardrobe of Frank Foster ShirtsPlease forgive me if you have covered this elsewhere, but have you essayed Roger Moore's FYEO pre-titled-sequence shirt? It has long been a favorite of mine. Thank you in advance for considering my query.
  • Matt Spaiser 5 December 2022 at 15:16 on James Bond’s Long-Sleeve Sport ShirtsDaniel Craig's shirt is probably more versatile.
  • Reid Stapleton 5 December 2022 at 14:29 on James Bond’s Long-Sleeve Sport ShirtsBetween a military-inspired safari-style shirt as you described and a single pocket shirt similar to what Daniel Craig wore in NTTD, which would you say is more versatile for warm weather?
  • Ian Fryer 5 December 2022 at 13:38 on The Top (00)7 Tailored Outfits of a Winter Bond WardrobeOf course, light blues are used often in movies, probably more so than in real life, because white shirts can flare under studio lights. A subtly off-white colour solves this problem.
  • Sinclair 5 December 2022 at 12:09 on The Top (00)7 Tailored Outfits of a Winter Bond Wardrobe(00)1, For a midnight blue velvet dinner jacket and midnight blue wool evening trousers, a light blue evening shirt isn't such a bad idea per se, but it somehow falls short in the scene and would have worked much better as a very pale blue pleated dress shirt.
  • tredstone 3 December 2022 at 13:18 on Is Bond Suits More About Bond or the Suits?Good idea!
  • Sinclair 3 December 2022 at 06:57 on James Bond Doesn’t Wear Wing CollarsI really like John Glen and have great respect for his work and how he moved up through the ranks in the film industry. The 5 Bond movies that he directed in the 80's are very near and dear to me. John Glen still holds the record for directing more Bond movies than any other film director.
  • Matt Spaiser 3 December 2022 at 05:55 on James Bond’s Tailored Casual Trouser StyleHeavier linen makes for better trousers.
  • Michael E Poplawski 2 December 2022 at 20:38 on Is Bond Suits More About Bond or the Suits?Well put Matt. I agree with your statement. Sometimes it is like the dog wagging the tail or the tail wagging the dog. The objective is to understand menswear and look good. Keep up the good work and this blog. I have been following for many years.
  • Reid Stapleton 2 December 2022 at 20:29 on James Bond’s Tailored Casual Trouser StyleSpeaking of linen, how heavy would you say a good pair of linen trousers should weigh? Are they better in lighter or heavier weights?
  • William 2 December 2022 at 19:53 on Is Bond Suits More About Bond or the Suits?I've been reading your blog since I was teenager in high school. Platforms and blogs come and go, and I am very glad that you still write regularly. You're an institution.
  • Hamish Crawford 2 December 2022 at 13:52 on James Bond Doesn’t Wear Wing CollarsIt is amusing that some commenters choose to take this as a specific and deliberate sartorial lapse of Timothy Dalton, and imply that he, casual-dress vulgarian that he is, specifically contrived to wear this outfit to tweak the collective noses of Roger Moore-adherent BondSuits connoisseurs of the future. As others have observed, and as Mr. Spaiser is at pains to note in the article, Bond is simply showing good manners by wearing the outfit selected for his friend's wedding. Not all our friends are blessed with good taste (my brother's fiancee is currently trying to get me to wear a pink shirt to their wedding to coordinate with her maid of honour--I only hope I'll be able to work around it more forcefully than Bond managed with Leiter). It would be more accurate to view this as Bond wearing a costume or disguise--no more representative of his taste and style than Mischka's maroon circus top and the clown outfit in "Octopussy", the Atomic Energy jumpsuit in "TWINE", Sir Hilary Bray's tweeds and kilt in "OHMSS", the Dia de los Muertos get-up in "SPECTRE", or the seagull headgear in "Goldfinger".
  • Matt Spaiser 2 December 2022 at 12:37 on James Bond Doesn’t Wear Wing CollarsI see The Living Daylights as being both a continuation of John Glen's previous three films with Moore but also a return to Fleming and a return to the style of the 1960s Bond films. For Your Eyes Only did the same.
  • Roger 2 December 2022 at 10:47 on James Bond Doesn’t Wear Wing CollarsI totally disagree that TLD is "essentially a Moore film with Dalton shoe-horned in," it's one of the most grounded films in the series, certainly one of the most espionage-y. There's no way Moore could have done some of the action scenes that Dalton does. TLD is a great film for Dalton, I love both it and LTK.
  • Sinclair 1 December 2022 at 14:57 on James Bond Doesn’t Wear Wing CollarsI concur that LTK is a very good Bond movie! I like it more than TLD. It is partly inspired by Japanese Samurai movies by Akiro Kurosawa and, just like FRWL (with the glove ritual before a kill), is partly inspired by Orson Welles brilliant film noir Touch of Evil (1958).
  • Rod+The+Mod 1 December 2022 at 09:40 on James Bond Doesn’t Wear Wing CollarsYeah LTK gets a lot of stick (much of it deserved in the clothing department) but I like it and certainly I think it improves on TLD which is essentially a Moore film with Dalton shoe-horned in. Both Bond girls in LTK are vastly superior to Maryam D’Abo who is another hapless screaming version of Stacey Sutton. It would have been interesting to see what Dalton would have made of the role in the more realistic and gritty era that eventually followed. LTK didn’t do so well financially in the US but did very well elsewhere IIRC. In one of the many books on Bond I have, there’s one - The Bond Files or something - in which they lambast LTK and say that from the earliest scene when Bond is being lowered from the helicopter to “go fishing” for Robert Davi’s plane he heralds the ridiculous tone of the film by flapping his arms like a turkey. I think this is harsh and unfair, as to me he was just signalling to Felix and the chopper crew above “lower … lower …” I wonder if the costuming - and the entire film - might have been judged less harshly if Felix and Della (who seems waaay over-familar with Bond at the wedding) had chosen to go with Lounge suits or even black lounge as 007 did twenty years earlier, instead of the ‘Florida Strip Mall’ rentals!
  • Rod+The+Mod 30 November 2022 at 22:32 on James Bond Doesn’t Wear Wing CollarsDon’t forget the backwards ones worn by Sean with the barkeycorn hacking jacket in Goldfinger!
  • Jim S 30 November 2022 at 21:45 on James Bond Doesn’t Wear Wing CollarsMy views on wing collars were informed by an old Miss Manners column. I googled and actually found it (dated Sept. 25, 1997). It’s true, you can find everything online. Here is the column - “ Dear I have been studying the way people wear their bow ties with wing-tip tuxedo shirts since someone pointed out to me that I was wearing the tips of my collar over the bow tie as opposed to behind the bow tie. I have since then observed people wearing it both ways. Is there a proper way to wear it? Gentle reader is tempted to say no. She hates the ring-around-the-collar look of a black tie with a wing-tip shirt, which only looks right with the more formal white tie worn with tails. But she can't actually claim that it is wrong. Wrong is wearing ruffled shirts, pink ties, collarless shirts with black bands around them, or any other of the many ghastly variations one shudders to see these days. Such as putting on a wing-collared shirt and then clipping its wings behind the tie.” Also, I liked the rented from a Florida strip mall look of the License to Kill wedding scene. That sort of thing happens when people get together from different places to be a part of a wedding. Happened to me and I will take anything that makes me like Bond. Now, I know Bond is fantasy, and part of the deal is luxury clothing for all, but I liked that bit of reality. Though Bond should have worn a tie with his suit at the airport. Suits without ties just look like someone forgot his tie.
  • Taka 30 November 2022 at 20:18 on James Bond: The Man in the Grey Flannel SuitThank you for your reply. There was no lining in the crotch area. My tailor suggested that when I make suits in the future, I should add a crotch lining as you said. But I don't know if this will solve the problem. I wrote a strong opinion, but I think my opinion is a little unfair this time unless I have experience wearing flannel pants with lining. But this is just my hunch... I think maybe lining works, but in the case of flannel it doesn't work as expected. I've been talking about flannel with a focus on practical and financial aspects. I think that is also unfair, so I would like to add a word at the end. As Bond showed in the film, a flannel suit gives a man a classic, timeless style. So no matter how expensive it is, no matter how durable it is. If it's cool, it's worth making a suit. James Bond, what a sinful man not only to women but to men as well!
  • Matt Spaiser 30 November 2022 at 12:47 on James Bond: The Man in the Grey Flannel SuitI'm sorry your flannel proved to be so delicate. Do your trousers have a crotch lining? That can help with the wear. I recommend sticking with flannel only for trousers, since when it wears out you don't have to worry about a suit wearing out. Worsted flannel is better for suits, but it should also be in a heavy weight.
  • John 30 November 2022 at 09:15 on James Bond Doesn’t Wear Wing CollarsArduous task indeed. I'll share my findings with you Matt. Bond's cufflinks in GoldenEye are probably solid silver (either a very thin toggle or whale back) most of the time. No evidence of the solid gold rectangular ones found in promotional stills (even with his dinner jacket). My bet is that Brosnan wears this pair with almost every outfit in the movie: https://www.thunderballs.org/goldeneyepromotionalstills?lightbox=dataItem-jxp0cjiw. Because silver is very reflective, it looks black/gunmetal most of the time (reflecting the lining of his jackets or the dark cinematography of the entire film). In OHMSS Lazenby wears double cuffs with a lounge suit only once in Portugal and I still haven't found any stills from the set to identify his cufflinks, but would bet on the round ones he wears in some production stills, or the gold pair from the casino scene (if they are not the same). Connery wears the same gold pair (probably chain links with one panel linked through a chain to a bar on the other side; I bet it's a chain link because of the weird angles it is seen in his introduction in Dr. No and the lab scene in GF) most of the time, except in the opening sequence in Goldfinger (round ones this time). These are present in Dr. No, probably FRwL (dinner jacket), Goldfinger (with his suits; not sure if he wears the round pair with his black dinner jacket or if it is a different pair), Thunderball (briefly in one take with the jet pack). Unsure of the cufflinks from YOLT with the double cuffs in the submarine scene. Moore probably wears gold cufflinks with his dinner suits when they have shirts with double cuffs. Dalton probably wears gold cufflinks with his dinner jackets in The Living Daylights, and round silver with onyx in Licence to Kill (maybe with a toggle bar instead of studs, but matching the style of his studs).
  • Taka 30 November 2022 at 07:17 on James Bond: The Man in the Grey Flannel SuitAs you comment, flannel is a delicate material. I totally agree with you. Three years ago, I made a suit 14 oz fabric of ゛famous〝 classic Flannel. I live in Tokyo and wear it for four months a week from December to March. I wore it only once a week. I did that for 3 years. What do you think then? The fabric in the crotch area has become so thin that it is almost transparent. There is no problem with a normal suit made at the same time. The flannel is the problem. Even in Japan, men's fashion magazines talk about flannel's splendor like a myth, and at the same time say that it is durable. But magazines never tell the fragility of flannel, which is an inconvenient truth for them. The fashion leaders who work for apparel companies in magazines have an unusual amount of suits. That's why they say flannel is durable. I think it's cowardly. Such excessive hoaxes have been rampant in the apparel industry until now. However, in this modern age where the information network has developed so much, such things will no longer work. I earnestly wish that. I'm sure there are people who are looking at this blog who want to make a flannel suit as a result of admiring 007. As a senior to them, I would advise them to only make flannel suits if they have money they can afford to lose. Let me be clear again. Flannel is expensive, but there is nothing about the durability that matches the price!
  • Scott 29 November 2022 at 18:23 on James Bond Doesn’t Wear Wing CollarsYes indeed! Just another Timothy Dalton fashion faux pas. Mercifully we only had to see him twice, and his ill fitting clothing, as Bond. Of course once would have been sufficient.