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  • Travers Alvirez 6 August 2020 at 16:05 on (00)7 Clothes from Bond’s Past That He Should Be Wearing TodayOh come on, Tim, they might as well be with all the current social justice clout-chasing ideas. It's not even giving them ideas anymore at this point, it's just waiting to happen.
  • jdreyfuss 6 August 2020 at 13:36 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsHaving your cufflinks perfectly match your belt buckle might look affected to those who notice it, but I doubt too many people would. If it's just a matter of having both a buckle and cufflinks made of silver, then matching the metals (white vs. yellow vs. red I mean) makes stylistic sense in the same way as matching your leathers.
  • Timothy 5 August 2020 at 22:26 on (00)7 Clothes from Bond’s Past That He Should Be Wearing Today"At least Bond hasn't time travelled yet!" Dan, no! Don't give them ideas!
  • Matt Spaiser 5 August 2020 at 20:48 on Basted for Bond: Examining Pierce Brosnan’s Brioni ClothesYes, that would be about right for most people.
  • tredstone 5 August 2020 at 14:51 on Basted for Bond: Examining Pierce Brosnan’s Brioni ClothesMatt, how would you define medium high rise trousers? Is that basically the waistband sitting at the level of the navel?
  • Dan Ippolito 5 August 2020 at 13:13 on (00)7 Clothes from Bond’s Past That He Should Be Wearing TodayJovan, what's ruining comic books is the writers' vainglorious obsession with "adult storytelling" and "raising the stakes", along with the deconstruction of beloved characters we've all grown up with. Oh, and let's not forget the impenetreable conundrums created by time travel and multiverses! At least Bond hasn't time travelled yet!
  • saul 5 August 2020 at 07:52 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsGeneralizations usually lead to assumptions and interpretations. We all know that assumptions are the mother of all (Fill in the negative word here and make sure it consists of four letters. If you don't know, its the word that Ian Fleming hated seeing on the page but said at the golf course.) In one of the old time books on Bond, I read never carry a clip made out of a Mexican silver dollar. Being Mexican I take pride in wearing cufflinks made out of Mexican silver, and now im starting to rethink my position. I used to try to match belt buckles and cufflinks, but is the matchy matchy thing a bit too much? I thought a double monk buckle was a bit much as well. They say we cant be perfect...I say why not? Keep Firing comrades, Saul
  • James Bond 007 5 August 2020 at 05:07 on Dinner Suit at Carnival in MoonrakerGreat post Mr. Spaiser! I like getting to see the times that James Bond has worn cocktail cuffs with black tie. This is something that I am a fan of. I think that cocktail cuffs can work for any look one is going for. I am pleased to see that in no time to die James Bond will return this look in bringing back the cocktail cuff with black tie. What do you think about this Matt considering that this was the last time James Bond had worn cocktail cuffs with black tie? Also, something else to note is this is the only time Roger Moore as James Bond does not wear patent leather shoes with his black tie outfit. Why do you think that is?
  • Jovan Gauthier-Vincent 5 August 2020 at 05:01 on Shirt DartsHow interesting. I would expect it the other way around.
  • Jovan Gauthier-Vincent 5 August 2020 at 04:54 on (00)7 Clothes from Bond’s Past That He Should Be Wearing Today"I’ve learned so much about things I was unformed about from the “friendly gatekeepers” on this very site. Including, to take this full circle, grenadine ties." These helpful people are not what I would call gatekeepers. Gatekeepers tend to not really be friendly or constructive whatsoever to people who don't "fit" into their community by a set of arbitrary, snobbish, or at worst bigoted standards. They're the type of people who think that the hiring of women, minorities, or members of the queer community are ruining comic books, just as one example.
  • Jovan Gauthier-Vincent 5 August 2020 at 04:41 on (00)7 Clothes from Bond’s Past That He Should Be Wearing Today"You have to remember, Tom Ford is anything but true elegance." The tailored clothing in the last two Bond films is hardly representative of what Tom Ford can achieve at its best. See, for example, the much better fitting suits in Quantum of Solace which were also made by Tom Ford. Shrunken fits are not the house style, this was a thing between Temime and Craig.
  • Shin-hau Khoo 5 August 2020 at 01:55 on Woman of Straw: The Blue Suit from GoldfingerMatt, I recently was fortunate to have found and watched a high definition format of the film. Two things I observed of the white shirts Connery (as AR) wore with this suit are: 1. Earlier in the film when receiving Ms. Marcello, the white shirt with the moderate spread collar and the light blue repp necktie has a 1/4" edge stitching, best seen in the close up on Connery after AR leaves Ms. Marcello in the nurse's room. It does not look like the other white shirt he wears later on with the black satin necktie. 2. The white shirt with the wider spread collar, worn with the black satin necktie has the same striped texture as the one he wears with the charcoal flannel suit in the final arc of the film. This leads me to believe that Connery might have worn the same shirt and necktie with both this dark blue suit and the charcoal flannel suit, in the later arcs of the film. The placket also has a similar style of stitching as Frank Foster's. The shape of the stripes on the shirt also looks too fine to be of a mini herringbone weave. Finally I lay out my observation that the suit jacket is un-vented. This is best seen in the scene when AR leaves the room (there is a good shot of Connery's rear), after talking to Ms. Marcello and after being interviewed by the police just prior.
  • Agent00Soul 4 August 2020 at 21:58 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsI always saw Brosnan's overdressing as a statement and also his cover. The 1990s were the first decade towards the casual world we live in now. By being so obviously the best-dressed in the room - or diving a BMW convertible into an oil field in Azerbaijan - he was signalling he was against the trend by going the other way. It made sense for his cover too: it is behavior that isn't too unbelievable for an account man at Universal Exports.
  • Timothy 4 August 2020 at 21:54 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsApropos of nothing, can I also point out how smart the gentleman looks in the background of the photo from A View to a Kill? Unbuttoned jacket and wing collar aside, it's a lovely, simple dinner suit which fits him very nicely.
  • Matt Spaiser 4 August 2020 at 18:32 on Mason & Sons Special Order Ivory Dinner JacketIt's partially to do with the lightweight cloth, which makes tiny fit discrepancies more apparent. With wear, these issues can go away.
  • Travers Alvirez 4 August 2020 at 17:55 on A Bespoke Anthony Sinclair Wedding Dinner Suit — Part 2: Cut and DetailsHuh... The more you know... Still, the work is excellent, so I'd take it for what it is. Still, much better than what's going on at Cleverley. LOL.
  • Travers Alvirez 4 August 2020 at 17:52 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsYou're kind of right, though, Tim. A good many parts of Brosnan's Bond was characterized by the overuse of cliché gadgets and pompous, almost Playboy-like outfits. Then again, Brosnan was dressed by Brioni, and before Tom Ford was the prime of all dimes, Brioni was "it".
  • Jtkuga 4 August 2020 at 16:56 on Mason & Sons Special Order Ivory Dinner JacketOverall I love this jacket. Wouldn't mind getting something like it myself in the future, although I don't attend enough black tie events to justify it at the moment considering my other more pressing needs. I have a question about the ripples, for lack of a better word, across your shoulder blades in the back. Do you believe that could have anything to do with the light weight of the cloth? I ask because I also noticed Simon Crompton of Permanent Style had a similar issue in a lightweight suit he had made.
  • Matt Spaiser 4 August 2020 at 15:23 on A Bespoke Anthony Sinclair Wedding Dinner Suit — Part 2: Cut and DetailsRose's arrangement with Mason isn't quite that simple. Rose is the cutter who cuts the bespoke Anthony Sinclair suits for Mason & Sons, but Mason does not run a bespoke shop in the way that Savile Row tailors do. Rose works independently, which is not an unusual arrangement for tailors in London.
  • Timothy 4 August 2020 at 11:56 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsAlthough it happens to be my favourite iteration of black-tie in the series, Brosnan's dinner suit in Tomorrow Never Dies makes him come off as a bit pompous, I think. I don't always agree with the notion that a flaw with Brosnan is that he was always the most obviously best-dressed man in the room, but it's true there. In fairness, his cover character is probably meant to come off that way.
  • Travers Alvirez 4 August 2020 at 07:43 on A Bespoke Anthony Sinclair Wedding Dinner Suit — Part 2: Cut and DetailsHenry Rose is the head cutter. He has had a career working for various other tailors before settling with the Masons, but please be clear in defining that he is the head cutter.
  • Travers Alvirez 4 August 2020 at 05:48 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsWould recommend you ditch the cummerbund altogether. There are traditions to be preserved, but there are some that should be optional. The cummerbund leans toward optional to "just ditch it".
  • Agent00Soul 4 August 2020 at 01:46 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsOne of these days I need to watch a Thunderball/Never Say Never Again double-feature.
  • Rod The Mod 4 August 2020 at 01:40 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsSome good analysis here Matt. I’d say the origin of some of these contrasts comes direct from Fleming himself, who usually described Bond kitted our in respectable but non flashy even utilitarian clothes by day and night, but in contrast went into the flashy details of how many of the larger-than-life villains (Goldfinger, Lippe, Drax, etc) were dressed.
  • jdreyfuss 3 August 2020 at 19:21 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsOn a side note, my sister moved her wedding ceremony from April to October (they're now doing the ceremony in October and a large reception next April, assuming things return to some form of normalcy by then), and has requested that all men wear black tie for the October gathering, so I finally get a chance to wear my tuxedo again. Instead of the scoop fronted vest and pleated shirt I wore to my wedding, I'm going to wear my T&A Casino Royale shirt, either with no waist covering or with a cummerbund.
  • Travers Alvirez 3 August 2020 at 19:15 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsKeep it simple and well balanced. The less amount of fuss and flashes, the better. Wear lighter colors, not brighter colors. Make sure the composition is taken in as a whole, and nothing stands out except for yourself.
  • Éric from France 3 August 2020 at 18:21 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsThe dinner jacket in LTK is awful but is a contrast to Sanchez’s striped wing collar shirt. It also contrasts with Heller’s tie and Truman-Lodge’s wing collar.
  • Saul 3 August 2020 at 18:01 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner JacketsAny rules you have to follow in order to avoid being pompous??? Define flashy
  • jdreyfuss 3 August 2020 at 13:33 on Good and Evil in Contrasting Dinner Jackets1. I think Largo's outfit in Thunderball is fairly subdued. Although he is a wealthy, high-ranking member of SPECTRE (or possibly because of that), he limits his flash to the relatively subtle plain gold studs, in a setting where the ivory double breasted dinner jacket, like Bond's mohair blend dinner suit, is distinctive but not showy. 2. Largo's outfit in Never Say Never Again, on the other hand is very flashy, especially in the early 80s, when menswear was returning to a more conservative style and Largo's black shirt and long tie would have been seen as much more out of place than, say, Terry Benedict's similar base layer in the heist sequence of Ocean's Eleven. The contrast piping also marks him as vain and attention-seeking. 3. Like you said, in addition to any narrative purpose, Kalba's ivory jacket serves the character in his day job as an entertainer. Even more flashy is his shirt, with it's pearl-embossed fly front and pleats replaced by either ruffles or guyabera-style stitching on the bib. Again though, since the man is a club owner, it serves to flesh out the character as much as to contrast him with Bond. 4. Zukovsky's outfit serves a similar purpose in The World is Not Enough, contrasting him with Bond's more sedate outfit and singling him as both the owner of the club and as someone striving for elegance, but with the lack of experience you might expect from someone who spent a lifetime as a midlevel agent for a communist government. 5. Silva's shirt is very flashy, but it is also well hidden behind a gray vest (waistcoat), reflecting his status as an affable villain, who obfuscates his duplicitous nature behind an elegant front. 6. At the horse auction, Bond is posing as the same sort of nouveau-riche climber as Zukovsky, so the slight fault of the more day than evening day-to-night jacket is part of his cover. Zorin, on the other hand, has embraced the look of the gentlemanly man about town from his first appearance, going so far as to wear gloves and a cane with the morning suit and topper prescribed for Ascot. Here he is similarly in a very classically proportioned dinner jacket, with wider lapels than were fashionable in the 1980s. The black pocket square still singles him out as sinister though. 7. Every player at the poker table in Casino Royale is wearing a different variation on evening wear, so it is difficult to single out Le Chiffre as distinguishing himself significantly from Bond, especially when Mr. Big and the Yakuza representative are wearing such wildly variant versions as an all-burgundy shot silk suit with day cravat and what appears to be a herringbone silk jacket with either a turtleneck or a tab-collar shirt. Le Chiffre's monochromatic look is elegant despite not being classic, in comparison. He is still strongly distinguished from Bond and Leiter (who is even more classically dressed than Bond, with a vest and stud fronted shirt), who wear white shirts and full suits in contrast with his velvet dinner jacket and black shirt. 8. One thing to note on Blofeld's look in Diamonds are Forever is that, like Silva, Blofeld is dressed casually and not in what he intended to be evening wear. 9. Khan's outfit is almost certainly intentional, since as Matt pointed out he has no problem dressing in Western fashion later in the film when he has no need to present himself as a mysterious Easterner to attract the attention of the European hotel guests. This is probably the only time that the contrast, even if not specifically intended by the character to reflect against Bond's outfit, was intentionally chosen by the character (in-film rather than simply a production choice) to provide a villainous contrast.
  • Travers Alvirez 3 August 2020 at 06:41 on (00)7 Clothes from Bond’s Past That He Should Be Wearing TodayMatt, Rod, thank you both. You get me. Matt, I'd be very surprised, if not borderline pissed, if something lumps you in with the iGentry folks. I know, you have an Instagram, but even though you have a bespoke suit made by Anthony Sinclair, you never shilled for them. You have countless other garments, and they were taken in account much the same. You're doing very well, you should have some pride of the good work you're doing. Rod, you took the words out of my mind, much less my mouth. The circus clowns and their idiocy never ceased to make me cringe, and worse yet, the young ones actually fall for those clownish dressing manners and behaviors. God, especially that Pitti Uomo. There's no individualism there; it's just a conglomerate of circus clowns competing for clout. Agent00Soul, it's more than just tones. It's also about the disseminations of idiocy and the poor taste afterwards. There are things that one should highly recommend to others, such as keeping it simple, organized, and well balanced, but the way they're "influencing" young ones to dress is down right criminal. Not only so, if one only dressed for the sake of just being dressed or seen by others, it's like how Beau Brummell dressed only to be seen, and ended up living such a meaningless, clownish, tragic life. While it is agreeable that meaning is insofar what we injected into our actions, it's also as important to know the importance of the things that we do, including the garments we drape across ourselves. My apologies for taking such an intense stance on this, but it must be spoken.