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  • Christian 17 September 2021 at 16:19 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistExcellent article. I must agree with the pro-Hemming/Brosnan comments above. I have come back around to fully appreciating the Brosnan tailoring (and entire era) as some of the best of the series. Great discussion by all.
  • Matt Spaiser 17 September 2021 at 11:27 on Basted for Bond: Examining Daniel Craig’s Tom Ford Clothes, Part 1The reason Temime gave for the fit was more about following fashions and giving Craig what he wanted more than anything else.
  • Matt Spaiser 17 September 2021 at 11:25 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistYes, the excess of cloth from Brosnan's first two films. A drape cut has the cloth specifically at the sides of the chest. Brosnan's suits have a full cut overall.
  • Matt Spaiser 17 September 2021 at 11:24 on James Bond’s Ecru and Cream ShirtsCream is more yellowish and lighter, and ecru is more beige and darker.
  • Alex 17 September 2021 at 10:14 on Basted for Bond: Examining Daniel Craig’s Tom Ford Clothes, Part 1I've also heard that either Jany Temime or Craig (he had a lot of wardrobe input) were intentionally going for a bursting-at-the-seams, "caged animal" kind of look as a storytelling vehicle to emphasize his aggression or ferocity or whatever. The suits aren't merely shrunken overall, they particularly bulge around his large bicep and thigh muscles. Not dissimilar to athletic wear, as you mentioned. I would buy this explanation if they had did it differently. It doesn't make sense, story-wise, for 007 to transition from a rough and newly-minted agent in the more refined Brioni and Regency clothes, to a seasoned and experienced operative now in shrunken O'Connor jackets. Likewise, to reflect his mental state, it would have made more sense during his post-Vesper QoS era to be wearing the ragey, near-bursting O'Connor stuff before moving on and progressing to the Regency cut. I just think they kind of got it backwards, probably because they were catering more to Craig's tastes and Temime's whims rather than to traditional style or true wardrobe storytelling.
  • Le Chiffre 17 September 2021 at 10:10 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistMatt, you mention an excess of cloth. Do you mean in the first two Brosnan’s Bond movies only ? How is that excess of fabric different than a drape cut ?
  • Le Chiffre 17 September 2021 at 09:07 on James Bond’s Bow Tie Shapes and SizesCheck out the videos on the gentleman’s gazette website. I did found the tip of turning one of the bowtie’s end on the other side before sliding it very helpful. If you still can’t manage it, go to a local tailor or shirtmaker you know, or the T&A store if you live in NY ! I am sure they will be pleased to help you !
  • Le Chiffre 17 September 2021 at 04:40 on James Bond’s Ecru and Cream ShirtsCream is more yellowish than ecru and ecru is closer to white than cream, am I correct ?
  • Pudding Galore 16 September 2021 at 22:03 on The Famous North By Northwest SuitGreat catch re: cuffs Le Chiffre! So either it's not the suit but very similar (from the same batch) or same suit but different pants or Mr. Grant altered the pants to get rid of the cuffs (per his preferred taste.
  • Eddy 16 September 2021 at 10:35 on James Bond’s Ecru and Cream ShirtsMany thanks indeed!
  • Matt Spaiser 16 September 2021 at 08:40 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistMonk shoes are considerably more formal than loafers. They’re equal in formality to derby shoes, which means they also vary a lot in formality. Brosnan’s plain-toe single-monk shoes are about equal to the plain-toe 2-eyelet derby shoes from Goldfinger.
  • Matt Spaiser 16 September 2021 at 08:36 on James Bond’s Ecru and Cream ShirtsI find that cream is easier to wear, and I think it looks more formal. Ecru looks better with earth tones.
  • Ivan B. 16 September 2021 at 07:08 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistConsidering The World is Not Enough is the film wherein Pierce Brosnan prominently wears monk shoes as opposed to the oxford brogues he wears he typically wears in the other films (save the navy suit he wore in the movie), are these along with the loafers he wears with the tan suit in Die Another Day the most "relaxed" shoes (at least compared to the oxford brogues he wore) Brosnan has ever worn or are his monk shoes still on the slightly formal side of the formality spectrum (I heard somewhere that said monk shoes are slightly more formal than loafers)?
  • Eddy 16 September 2021 at 02:09 on James Bond’s Ecru and Cream ShirtsMr Spaiser, may I seek your advice? Im thinking of buying my first off-white shirt from Mason & Sons, and I don't know whether to go with cream or ecru twill. My main day-to-day suits are charcoal and navy. May I ask your advice?
  • Matt Spaiser 16 September 2021 at 00:58 on Correcting the Fit of Daniel Craig’s Suit in SpectreThis suit, like all the others in the film, was made specifically for Daniel Craig. They all have the same fit and were made by the same people at Tom Ford. This style was not available off the pegs until after Spectre was made. I have a few theories as to why the suit looks like this, but it was definitely made from his own pattern. I am both the author of this post and the man who commented that the jacket length should cut the body in half. However, the traditional rule along with that is that the jacket should be long enough to cover the buttocks. A jacket that doesn’t do that always looks too short IMO. The legs won’t look any longer when the buttocks are in the way. Daniel Craig has long legs for his height, so the jacket not covering his buttocks wasn’t doing him any favours. I think the extra length is needed to cut the body in half. Sleeve length only relates to the wrist, not arm length. There’s a functional aspect to sleeve length that I’m sure you’re aware of.
  • Matt Spaiser 15 September 2021 at 22:33 on James Bond’s Bow Tie Shapes and SizesBatwing bow ties are done the same way as butterfly bow ties. I find them easier to tie!
  • Todd 15 September 2021 at 21:38 on James Bond’s Bow Tie Shapes and SizesHas no one found a decent video for how to tie a batwing bow tie? I've searched on Youtube and they're all rather dreadful. Either mumbling, mixing up right versus left hand, poor camera work so one can't see what's being pushed through which end, etc. Help! I've an opera opening on Saturday!
  • Chris David Bykowski 15 September 2021 at 20:12 on Correcting the Fit of Daniel Craig’s Suit in SpectreMany of times the wardrobe gets pushed and they have to settle for crap fit. I deal with this all the time when film stylist are rushing and trying to borrow suits from my brand for movie a wardrobe. I doubt this was made for Daniel and if it was it was either rushed for a crap deadline which is usually the case or the person who made it was a rookie and lucky to get the job. Jacket length is more subject to splitting your body in half like the man said in the above comment. You do not always go off the arm length rule. Same with sleeve length. You have to look at the clients body and if they have long arms for their height you have to balance it out. Especially if they have short legs, it better to go a little shorter to even out the torso and leg length proportions. The worst you can do is make them look shorter with a long coat.
  • Matt Spaiser 15 September 2021 at 10:39 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistI think that "expensive" look comes from the long cashmere overcoats and the cufflinks. Otherwise, nothing in Brosnan's wardrobe would be more expensive than what Connery wore. Brioni doesn't cost more than a bespoke suit. Maybe the excess of cloth in the suits made them look more luxurious than the bespoke suits from earlier decades. If people think the stronger shoulders and shape of the lapels that define the Brioni silhouette makes the suits look more expensive, I think that's a bit silly.
  • Matt Spaiser 15 September 2021 at 10:13 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistBrosnan did indeed wear monk shoes with his suits. He wears them with a few suits in The World Is Not Enough.
  • tredstone 15 September 2021 at 09:05 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistI remember the early critiques of Hemming's approach was that Bond had become "expensively dressed" rather than just "well dressed"... this was mentioned in the "Spy who came out of the closet" series that was among the first articles I ever read on Bond clothing on the web. Around the time we reached the peak of the slim suit trend around Skyfall, I think that just further highlighted the contrast to what was done during the Hemming years, with what was a classic, full cut suit becoming viewed (through the lens of that time) as a baggy, long '90s 3-button power suit. Similarly, I think around that time was when Moore's tailoring was the least appreciated and quickly dismissed by many... but lately I think people are coming around on that. While Brosnan was 'expensively dressed', I think it was tastefully done and as Matt says, kind of reminiscent of a classic Hollywood style.
  • Bill Tanner 15 September 2021 at 08:44 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistNice thoughtful review. I enjoy the look of the traditionalist style. Hemming always had a unique taste with neckties. My favorite addition that Hemming made was the use of double cuffs. I prefer double cuffs as my go to cuff. I never owned a turnback cuff shirt, and I never really like barrel cuff shirts. I love Bronson different cufflinks he wore through his films. I also love Craig's coffin cufflinks as well. I wish Craig's Bond would have continued the look of a three piece suit. He does wear two on Spectre, but I wish their would be more. I do like how Craig's Bond brought back the turnback cuff. I never owned one, but I believe that is my favorite cuff for the character. I also recall that Bronson wore monk strap shoes. I do not believe he wore them with any of his business suit, but I could be wrong. Anyways, great article Matt. My best, Bill
  • James+Bond+007 15 September 2021 at 06:42 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistInteresting article Matt! I never knew that a lot of these styles in the 1990s where from the 1940s. I do recall when I read your post about Bond's tuxedo in tomorrow never dies being inspired from the 1940s so I guess that does make sense. As always very interesting read.
  • Matt Spaiser 14 September 2021 at 21:24 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistI've always appreciated her work, and I have been influenced by it for decades. But I think the passage of time has provided me with new perspectives. I started writing this blog post months ago, but it took a lot of thinking to really figure out the best angle for it.
  • Le Chiffre 14 September 2021 at 20:40 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistI couldn’t agree more ! It recalls classic Hollywood style while remaining understated -no details such as pin collars or striped double breasted suits, which are very stylish but also a little flashy. Glad to see you seem to appreciate Hemming more than a few years ago !
  • Matt Spaiser 14 September 2021 at 18:50 on Does Bond Ever Remove His Suit Jacket for a Fight?Thank you for the corrections.
  • Spelling 14 September 2021 at 16:08 on Does Bond Ever Remove His Suit Jacket for a Fight?1. the conclusion of an confrontation > the conclusion of a confrontation 2. the same was he is for a battle > the same way he is for a battle
  • 78 14 September 2021 at 15:32 on James Bond’s Love of Mohair"Two-tone fabrics which show two colours depending on how the light hits" aren't necessarily cheap, and are properly called changeable fabrics.
  • tredstone 14 September 2021 at 13:50 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistGreat perspective, thanks!
  • Matt Spaiser 14 September 2021 at 13:47 on Lindy Hemming’s Bond: The Sartorial TraditionalistI used to look back on her era as being less classically British and more modern and continental, but now I see it as the most traditionally Bond has ever dressed. I now see it as comparable to the style in a Cary Grant film and something that people will look back on fondly. I still prefer the years of English bespoke suits for Bond, though bringing back Turnbull & Asser was an excellent decision. I don't agree with all of Hemming's choices, but I don't think she made any bad choices and I still admire what she did. I think enough time has passed since she's worked on Bond that I look at it being "classic Bond" now.