Basted for Bond: Examining George Lazenby’s Dimi Major Clothes

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This week’s “Basted for Bond” infographic features George Lazenby’s Dimi Major jackets, trousers, waistcoats and coats. The clothes have a classic English cut with some fashionable updates for the 1960s, like a short jacket length and narrow straight-leg trousers. Jacket variations presented here include Lazenby’s dinner jacket, his wedding lounge jacket and his double-breasted blazer. His car coat and caped ulster coat are also included.

Basted-for-Bond_Dimi-Major

34 COMMENTS

  1. Thanks Matt!

    In general I like the OHMSS style – except some 70s details which look ridiculous today (ruffled-front shirts, brown golf dress etc.). As already stated elsewhere the cut of the Dimi Major suits flatters Lazenby’s physique and even looks a bit fresher than Connery’s Sinclair suits. And although there are some concessions the 70s style it is never over the top (what unfortunately has to be said of almost all the items Moore wore as the “70s Bond”).

      • Many fashions associated with the 1970s started in the mid or late 1960s. I believe Roger Moore started wearing ruffled-front shirts in The Saint a year earlier.

    • Sorry, I think my point wasn’t clear — that is, since it wasn’t the ’70s yet, they avoided some of the excesses that Roger Moore’s wardrobe had.

  2. The best clothing of the series. I will be using this infographic the next time I visit my tailor.

    Matt, I hope you make it to Major’s shop eventually and write about it.

  3. I would certainly place Lazenby’s clothing and tailoring as second to Connery’s. I feel sorry for Roger Moore who had to sport the excesses of the 70’s when he probably had the best figure for showing off clothes. However, as many have pointed out, the more interesting and imaginative colours were definitely welcome. I feel most sorry for Daniel Craig, even more so than Dalton, who is simply being butchered with the modern crap they are making him wear, irrespective of the quality of the material. In my opinion, he will look the most dated of the 007’s in years to come.

    • Daniel Craig had some input into the clothes of Skyfall and Spectre, though. It’s actually suggested he wanted the close fit, which is unfortunate as it flatters his body the least.

  4. Matt, what’s your definition of an ‘Ulster collar’ since you’ve labelled both coats as such and yet the collars look completely different?

    I agree with the above comment about Craig – his close-fitting stuff might be ‘on trend’ (urgh) for now but I doubt will be considered ‘classic’ in any way when we look back in a few years. I really don’t like much of Tom Ford’s stuff anyway, even his own personal style of huge lapels, tall-collared shirts open to the waist, designer stubble to take the attention off his receding hairline and giant sunglasses.

    • An Ulster collar is where the lapels can be folded over, and the coat can be buttoned up all the way. The difference between the two picture here is that on is double-breasted whilst the other is single breasted. They are still very similar. It might be more correct to call the collar on the Ulster a Prussian collar rather than an Ulster collar, though the two are closely related.

  5. “And although there are some concessions the 70s style it is never over the top (what unfortunately has to be said of almost all the items Moore wore as the “70s Bond”). Oh dear, here we go again, I would love to know what could be deemed OTT about “almost all” Roger Moore’s 1970’s Bond clothes. What was OTT about say the chesterfield coat, grey suits, beige suit, tan sports cost and polo neck ensemble in Live and Let Die? What was OTT about Golden Gun’s grey DB suit, marine blue suit, olive suit, charcoal suit or navy blazer? Fair enough, many of the tailored outfits in Spy weren’t to everybody’s taste but most of the Moonraker suits weren’t OTT either? Finally, Steve, I would think Craig, as a big fan of Tom Ford both privately as well as in his Bond persona, would have a fairly large input into Bond’s wardrobe. I mean, even if he conscientiously refused to wear the particular line of Ford suits the producers have chosen for him I’m sure they’d replace them for another line of his choosing.

    • All right – so some samples are needed:
      Flared legs on almost all 70s trousers, link button cuffs on his suits’ coats + overwide lapels, some rather ugly patterns on both suits resp. odd jackets (TMWTGG tweed jacket), on shirts and ties (shirt + tie worn with brown silk suit in TSWLM and the MR ones), not to speak of some leisure outfits that IMO cannot be considered as tasteful (to say the least) like the powder blue one in LALD and all the safari outfits. I don’t know how often this has already been quoted throughout this blog, but well…

      These are only some of the features which make his outfits look dated from a today’s perspective. I admit that there are items in Moore’s film wardrobe which are more on the classic side (LALD chesterfield f.i.), but those are exceptions. And some films are – from a sartorial point of view – better (TMWTGG) while others are worse (TSWLM, MR). But IMO there’s no chance that anybody would seriously consider them being timeless with regard to style – they are hopelessly “70s victims”.

      But on the other hand it’s also true that this could be said once of the suits Craig wore in SF and will wear in SPECTRE. I am surely no fan of the actual Tom Ford sausage look. But perhaps with the Bond films still to come there will be a change of style. Hopefully.

      And BTW: Moore also was certainly not uninvolved in the choice of what he wore as James Bond – if you blame Craig for this, you’ll also have to blame him.

    • The point that I’ve made here several times is that ALL clothes look dated eventually. You’ll never get away from that as fashions and styles always change. We’ll never settle on one “look” that is cemented in stone and never change. I can guarantee you that any older style that you appreciate now as “classic” was at one point derided for being dated, and will be again (at several different points in the future).

      I’m sure that there are several comments about “dated clothing” in the comments for the SPECTRE trailer, but I can’t read it. I clicked on the new comments link a while back and was fortunate enough to avert my eyes when I saw (it appeared) that someone was discussing a “plot hole” in SPECTRE. I guess I’ll comment in November! It’s getting harder and harder to avoid spoilers…

  6. @TheLordFlasheart: “You’ll never get away from that as fashions and styles always change. We’ll never settle on one “look” that is cemented in stone and never change.”

    -On the whole I agree to this but there are different grades of looking dated. Especially when it comes to suits because although not cemented in stone the suit actually has kept its overall appearence for now nearly 100 years without big changes. So if you adapt such an item as traditional as the suit to rather extreme fashion fads the effect is all the more striking. And 70s were rather extreme, flashy and loud (“The age that style forgot”).

    So you always could have worn Connery’s Edwardian-style suits with drainpipe trousers, narrow lapels etc. (and of course you can wear it today) without being laughed at but the same would not be true for a suit with 70s flared trousers etc. We have had already a 70s revival in the 90s but significantly it were restricted to casual clothes and not to suits. No designer of today would seriously consider producing a suit with flared legs – who would buy it?

    • “So you always could have worn Connery’s Edwardian-style suits with drainpipe trousers, narrow lapels etc. (and of course you can wear it today) without being laughed at…”

      Sorry, but that’s simply not true. I well remember in the 1970s people making fun of Connery’s suits, about how ridiculous they looked. As well, I can’t imagine anyone wearing one of Connery’s ensembles from the 60s when 4 inch ties, large, low-gorge lapels and wide shoulders were in style in the 90s.

      “We have had already a 70s revival in the 90s but significantly it were restricted to casual clothes and not to suits.”

      True and interesting, although I do have a suit from around 2004 that has flared legs and quite a low rise to the trousers. I’ve never seen the film but on the poster for The Wedding Crashers Owen Wilson is wearing a suit that looks almost identical to mine.

  7. Firstly, the original statement referred to “over the top” clothes and not
    the matter of whether they appeared “dated” or “timeless”. Everything,
    barring what is current will seem somewhat dated so after that it just
    comes down to how correctly fitting, tasteful and rooted in the traditions
    of male tailoring the outfit is.

    And for some facts; very few of Moore’s outfits could be referred to as
    “leisure” suits (a fact Matt himself has pointed out time and time again),
    the trousers and lapels in his first 2 movies were very much conservative
    given the fashions of the times. Not at all OTT. The Angelo Roma ones were
    more fashionable but very well tailored. The width of the lapels and flares
    still weren’t excessive for the time and indeed by 1979 were even a little
    passé. I can’t recall any suits from the 1970’s with “ugly” patterns
    unless you dislike stripes, and the sports coat in TMWTGG was indeed a
    vibrant plaid and I and others on the blog always felt it to look a little
    inappropriate to its setting but whether it can be construed as ugly is a
    matter of personal taste. I personally wouldn’t care for the light blue
    ensemble from “Live and Let Die” but it wasn’t unlike a denim jacket and
    matching trousers (although Matt pointed out that it was a lighter cotton
    than denim, no doubt as a climatic consideration) which was very popular
    for many years and is hardly OTT. The safari clothing was firmly rooted in
    British tradition (another fact Matt has pointed out ad infinitum). I
    personally didn’t find any of the tie patterns ugly (and indeed I haven’t
    found most of the ties worn by all the Bond’s to be ugly barring perhaps a
    certain one worn in DAF!) Contrary to what you assert, I would find his OTT
    clothes to be the exceptions. Furthermore, given what we’ve seen of
    Lazenby’s predilictions, I’ve no doubt at all that he would have, if
    anything, exceeded the excess you object to regarding Moore (just look at
    Matt’s post on the movie The Man from Hong Kong) had he continued on as Bond through the 1970’s but of course that’s
    conjecture.

    “I don’t know how often this has already been quoted throughout this blog,
    but well…” Yes, I too find repeating balanced facts very repetitive but
    then again people insist on repeating the same old clichés. Most of this
    seems to be an overall feeling viewers glean from viewing Moore’s Bond
    clothing in the round but if examples are taken individually most of the
    criticisms don’t add up IMO.

    Finally, of course I am well aware that Moore’s personal tailor and
    shirtmaker were used for all his Bond movies. It’s bizarre that you would
    pint this out as it’s common knowledge on the blog and my point re: Craig
    was simply that he could choose a better tailored and proportioned Ford
    range (like in “QOS” or the black 3 piece suit from SPECTRE) if he chose to
    except that he is happy to go along with these other ones which some
    dinosaurs not anchored by the excesses of current fashions would find
    “ugly” (certainly in the case of “Skyfall”)!

    • I think Matt demonstrated exactly why the cut (not style — an important distinction) of Moore’s clothes isn’t actually dated at all in one post. Yes, the lapels, shirt collar, and slight flare trouser look a little silly today. But the clothes are still well made and fit his body perfectly. The biggest culprit is that many people tend to view any ’70s clothing with suspicion and preconceived expectations.

      If you look at Kingsman (which I wrote about on my blog recently if you’re interested) the English cut of those suits is not dated whatsoever either. The medium rise, flat front, straight leg trousers may go a little in or out of fashion, but that’s about it. But that’s not even the fashion extreme of today. They didn’t give the men narrow lapels or low rise skinny trousers thank goodness.

  8. “Firstly, the original statement referred to “over the top” clothes and not
    the matter of whether they appeared “dated” or “timeless”. ”

    BECAUSE Moore’s Bond clothes are over the top they are hardly to be considered timeless. If a garment, especially a suit, sticks out because of rather extreme features like the ones I cited above it will clearly be attributed to a certain time or decade and therefore will appear dated.

    “the trousers and lapels in his first 2 movies were very much conservative
    given the fashions of the times.”
    -Yes, perhaps, but the fashions of the times are not the criterion to judge by. The criterion is timelessness and not 70s fashion.

    ” I can’t recall any suits from the 1970’s with “ugly” patterns unless you dislike stripes”
    -I like stripes very much but not those Moore had on his ties in TSWLM, MR and AVTAK and on his shirts in TSWLM. And I think they are not very likely to be worn by anyone today. Of course it’s a matter of personal taste and what I have stated is nothing but my personal opinion.

    “The safari clothing was firmly rooted in British tradition (another fact Matt has pointed out ad infinitum)”
    -That’s true but no one in the 1970s wore it any more. That Moore wore them as Bond is of course a gag – and as the “tongue-in-cheek Bond” it suits him very well.

    I am stopping it here because I think we won’t get any further. I have my point of view and you have yours and we both stick to it. That’s all right.
    But let me conclude by making clear that I am no “Roger Moore dispraiser”: There are certain items of his Bond wardrobe that I like, f.i. the double-breasted chesterfield from LALD, the white silk dinner jacket from TMWTGG and the double-breasted suits shown there. The garments which are more on the classic / timeless side. So it’s not a dislike of Moore as a person but only a slight dislike of 70s fashion. No offence meant!

  9. The only thing I wish to add that I disagree with the sentiment expressed above (I believe by Lord Flasheart) that there’s no such thing as timeless. I would point to the tailored clothing depicted in this very post as the most timeless of the series. I can’t imagine it ever looking out of style.

    • This is the politest discussion I’ve ever seen on a forum. Topics are raised, opinions clash, differences are agreed upon, everyone shakes hands and straightens their ties.
      Well done, chaps.

  10. @TheLordFlasheart
    “I well remember in the 1970s people making fun of Connery’s suits, about how ridiculous they looked. As well, I can’t imagine anyone wearing one of Connery’s ensembles from the 60s when 4 inch ties, large, low-gorge lapels and wide shoulders were in style in the 90s.”

    -Please forgive me but IMO 70s fashion can be no benchmark because it went too much to extremes. So to me 1970s people sneering at Connery’s suits simply don’t count. Connery’s suits came considerably closer to timelessness as 70s suits could ever do. Yes some minor things like lapel width, amount of drape etc. differ throughout the series but the overall look didn’t change much. There are people who say that in the 1990s when everybody was wearing 3-button jackets you couldn’t come up with a 2-buttoned one, but to me that’s a bit nit-picky and shows a perspective too much influenced by fashion. And please consider: A bespoke suit is supposed to be more durable and is expected to be worn over quite a period (not at least because it’s considerably pricier than than an off-the-peg one!). Given this its wearer can’t and should not care too much about fashion fads. Otherwise you had to throw away your whole wardrobe every half year. Discussing Bond’s suits is foremost about style and not about fashion.

    Best, Renard

    • “So to me 1970s people sneering at Connery’s suits simply don’t count. ”

      That’s the “no true Scotsman” fallacy. Even if that was true, it still wouldn’t explain away other periods of time where the cut of Connery’s 1960s suits would look outdated. While Connery’s suits would look less far away from mid- to late-90s suits than other periods, someone would still stick out like they were wearing a costume if they wore one at the time . BTW, I realize that the 90s had a range of looks for men’s suits, and when I said the wide-shouldered, wide-lapelled (?) suits I meant the early 90s (which I suppose was really a carry over from the late 80s).

      There’s an interesting question raised – obviously people who wear “in-style” suits (known to most of the general public as “suits”) don’t have to throw them out “every half year”. How long does a style of suit remain “in style” for? It seems to me that men’s suits keep a relatively consistent look for about 8 years or so. Thoughts?

    • Whilst I agree in large part with TheLordFlasheart’s view, I’m not sure the argument about early to mid-nineties style really holds true. The sort of wide shouldered soft tailored Italian style suits you mention were about but they were relatively uncommon and really stuck out. Much more common were double breasted, 6×1 fastening suits but suits with classic proportions weren’t that uncommon as I remember it. Certainly, as a late teenager, turning 20, in exactly that period, Connery’s suits were clearly not the fashion of the day but never once looked anything other than classic and stylish to me and others my age.

    • “That’s the “no true Scotsman” fallacy. ”
      -I think you could be right 🙂 It’s true that – quite obvious – I have rather strong views on 70s fashion.

      “How long does a style of suit remain “in style” for? ”
      -As already stated that’s a question I would leave aside when it comes to bespoke suits. A bespoke suit is made for an individuum to flatter its body. If such a person f.i. has shoulders which are rather on the narrow side a wide-lapelled 70s suit would look wrong on him. Fashion is something which I would attribute to designers but not to bespoke tailors. As long as a suit fits its proprietor well and as long as the cloth is still in good shape I don’t see why it shouldn’t be worn. I myself have suits which are much older than 10 years and they’re still part of my daily wardrobe. It’s only a question of good craftmanship and quality.

  11. Matt

    Putting aside from my usual flippant remarks for a second, could I post this link?

    http://youtu.be/mWNz95YeIaI

    At 12:20, you can hear Timothy Dalton discussing his Bond clothes and fashion for a moment. Exactly how much of an influence this view had on his Bond’s clothes may still be up for discussion but could I request you complete the set and consider an infographic for Timothy Dalton’s Bond suits? I know they’re not very nice, I know some are seemingly straight off the peg but he is a Bond, one of the very best, his two films were relevant in turning the corner towards the harder Bond in the latter half of the series (The Living Daylights was the last PG rated Bond film), he does look pretty good in his three piece suit and, damn it all, you’ve gone to so much effort, you can’t leave a gaping hole in your set! Please reconsider. If only to prove a point.

    Thank you!
    🙂

    • Dan, I can appreciate your point and I wouldn’t speak for Matt but I assume the problem would be the lack of uniformity in his wardrobe not even from one movie to the other but even in relation to his first movie the suits were produced by a number of outfitters incl several by a British tailor called Benjamin Simon and others were courtesy of a Viennese tailor. In Licence to Kill I believe an LA based outfit provided many of the “suits”

      • The difficulty in doing this for Dalton is that apart from a few Benjamin Simon suits, other suits come from varying sources in The Living Daylights. I may attempt to see what I can put together

    • I concur too. After all, Dalton is a Bond actor too.
      Considering the diversity, it is true indeed, but Dalton made only two movies and didn’t wear that much tailored clothing -correction : not as much as Lazenby or Moore did in some films !
      Besides, speaking of diversity, I see at least one actor who will certainly be the source of much more work for Matt : Craig. In the infographics series, he will almost merit one article per movie, or at least three articles for four movies for the moment, since the style of his tailored clothes changes almost every movie.

      Plus I think some of his tailored clothing in TLD deserves some credit (the checked sport coat, the grey flannel suit, the beige summer suit, the shawl collar dinner suit) !

      Dan, thank you for sharing your link by the way.

    • I second the request of having Dalton’s films included. The Benjamin Simon suits from TLD and the suits from LTK. The latter ones are obviously awful but pointing out the specific problems in a infographic article could really help to understand exactly what was wrong with them. Just my thoughts.

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