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  • Matt Spaiser 15 December 2017 at 23:38 on A Wardrobe of Frank Foster ShirtsI will have to check to see exactly where the collar points sit. The length of the points meeting up with the length of the tie knot is just a coincidence here. The width and taper of the tie just makes this the perfect tie to pair with this collar. A tie that is narrower in the knot area would make the knot shorter, which is fine too, but not as perfect as the tie here is. I think that as long as the tie knot doesn't extend below the collar points it looks fine.
  • jojo 15 December 2017 at 23:10 on A Wardrobe of Frank Foster Shirts...looking at the blue bengal and burgundy tie I can also see the symmetry FF designed in to the collar. The upper collar line at neck sits at an acute (45° to the horizontal) which is mirrored in the lower line to collar point. This makes the upper and lower V identical. Moreover the two points meet at a point just below the adam's apple. Additionally, the side lines of the collar are almost perfect - they sit a few degrees off vertical and allow for a lengthening and slight widening of the neck in perfect proportions. It's similar to looking at a great bespoke suit - the more you look the more you see - a lifetimes work takes craft to being art. I can see your point about the 1cm gap and I also note that FF designed the collar point ends to be the same length as the tie knot. Out of interest do the collar points sit just on the collar bone?
  • jojo 15 December 2017 at 21:41 on A Wardrobe of Frank Foster ShirtsGreat analysis and description of how the collar/tie works - very clear. Thank you Matt.
  • Matt Spaiser 15 December 2017 at 14:14 on A Wardrobe of Frank Foster ShirtsFrank Foster is priced lower than any other comparable bespoke shirtmaker. When factoring the cost of 6 shirts, you'd be able to save enough money to fly to London to go see them.
  • saul 15 December 2017 at 06:33 on A Wardrobe of Frank Foster ShirtsFor those of us not able to cross the pond to visit the frank foster company, what other shirt makers would you suggest? In my closet you would find turnbull and asser, but I have always favoured borrelli. Your thoughts?
  • Matt Spaiser 15 December 2017 at 03:24 on A Wardrobe of Frank Foster ShirtsFoster always made a large collar for Moore, which balanced and drew attention to his face. The collar needs to be properly sized, and too often the collar is either too small or too short. 1 cm of tie space allows the tie to sit comfortably in the collar and draws attention to the tie. The tie space also opens up the collar so that tie is more connected with the face. When there is no tie space the collar is a barrier between the tie and the face; the tie isn't able to pop out as much and can feel suffocated on narrower collars. When there is tie space everything can connect, but the tie can stand out and breathe. Aoso important is the 7 mm stitching from the edge of the collar to give presence to the collar, which in turn emphasise the face. Traditional collars are stitched 1/4" from the edge, which is slightly less than 7 mm, but it's also fine. Any less that 6 mm from the edge and I find that the collar looks weak. Edge stitching is popular on cheap shirts, and it can look more formal, particularly when wearing collar stiffeners because the stiffeners can reach the edge of the collar. Foster did not like edge stitching. No shirt is designed better than a Frank Foster shirt. A few other English shirtmakers also have the right idea.
  • jojo 15 December 2017 at 02:57 on A Wardrobe of Frank Foster ShirtsMatt, love this article - congratulations on such a fine collection - I think the blue Bengal looks best overall. Matt can I ask you to consider writing an article on the collar shape and style of FF shirts? The reason I ask is that having viewed the RM films recently his outfits come together around the FF shirts - and the epicentre of the shirt is where tie and collar meet and frame the face/upper torso. They have a particular shape and style (almost an outward, downward curve) that compliments the suit and tie yet brings the viewers eye to the face - how did FF achieve this? No other shirts (T & A, Brioni etc.) achieve the effectiveness or simplicity of this function. Thank you.
  • Algy 12 December 2017 at 18:09 on James Bond Brings Back the TurtleneckIt's the same in Sweden, David (I'm half Swedish). A "turtleneck" is what an American would call a "mock turtle neck". The roll back version is a "polo neck" (or "polotröja", to be exact).
  • Le Chiffre 12 December 2017 at 17:05 on Anthony Sinclair Pink Shirt and Grey Trousers from Mason & SonsI have to be honest, if I could, I would rob your whole wardrobe.
  • Renard 11 December 2017 at 17:23 on James Bond Black Tie Illustrations by Pat CarbajalWhat a grave mistake by my side - how could I be so inattentive! Correction: " Each of his drawings..."
  • Jovan Gauthier 11 December 2017 at 17:10 on Anthony Sinclair Pink Shirt and Grey Trousers from Mason & SonsIf I recall correctly, this is a homage to the nametags on the original line of Mr Fish clothing.
  • Kyle 11 December 2017 at 14:34 on Anthony Sinclair Pink Shirt and Grey Trousers from Mason & SonsA few years ago I purchased an Anthony Sinclair special order shirt to replicate one of my favorites from the series as well, the one Roger Moore wears outside the Bottoms Up club, which I happened to wear last Thursday! Here's the one I mean. http://www.bondsuits.com/the-olive-suit/ David Mason has done a great service for us Bond clothing geeks and for the well-dressed in general in reviving this brand.
  • Dan Gale 11 December 2017 at 11:16 on Anthony Sinclair Pink Shirt and Grey Trousers from Mason & SonsWhat a great colour combination. I like that a lot. Why does the label say “Made peculiarly”? I’m pleased to hear they now cater for the peculiar (gives me hope) but it’s a strange slogan.
  • saul 11 December 2017 at 06:08 on James Bond Black Tie Illustrations by Pat CarbajalYes, I remember in that article in great detail. So in that case, regardless of the actor playing bond you still would go with the classic greys and blues. Would you happen to have any color combinations in mind? (As mentioned previously, brosnan being placed in blue and brown.)
  • Jovan Gauthier 11 December 2017 at 03:50 on James Bond Black Tie Illustrations by Pat CarbajalPat is referred to by male pronouns throughout the article.
  • Matt Spaiser 10 December 2017 at 17:14 on James Bond Black Tie Illustrations by Pat CarbajalHow I would dress James Bond is covered here: http://www.bondsuits.com/how-i-would-dress-james-bond/ I would dress James Bond based on the character rather than based on the actor playing him.
  • saul 10 December 2017 at 16:30 on James Bond Black Tie Illustrations by Pat CarbajalSince we are on the topic of creation, i would like for you to consider the following as a future topic for an article, if it tickles your fancy as they say. There are reports that hugh Jackman did indeed turn down the role of bond. Let's say, he did decide to play bond how would you have dressed him?
  • Matt Spaiser 10 December 2017 at 15:22 on Roger Moore: Blue Blazer BossBlazers are good for social occasions when a suit may be too formal or serious but you still need to look dressed up.
  • saul 10 December 2017 at 12:40 on Roger Moore: Blue Blazer BossIs there any occasion where a blazer should or shouldn't be worn?
  • saul 10 December 2017 at 04:13 on Roger Moore: Blue Blazer BossMy mistake ....
  • Matt Spaiser 10 December 2017 at 03:59 on Roger Moore: Blue Blazer BossA blazer and a suit can be equally elegant, they just don't serve the same exact purpose, though there is overlap. I don't think I ever said that one should wear stripes whenever talking to someone about financial issues, only that stripes may have banker connotations.
  • saul 10 December 2017 at 02:47 on Roger Moore: Blue Blazer BossDo you think wearing a blazer is more elegant than wearing a complete suit? What does the blazer say? I ask because you mentioned in one of your articles that whenever talking to someone about financial issues one should wear stripes. Rules like that make dressing for the occasion so much easier.
  • Christian 9 December 2017 at 23:53 on Commander of the Cloth, Part 4: Daniel CraigWell-taken point about the choice of suitings by Temime. This series (Commander of the Cloth) has been excellent - keep up the great work.
  • Christian 9 December 2017 at 23:38 on Commander of the Cloth, Part 3: Pierce BrosnanI am late to this party, but there are three great points above that I wanted to agree with: first, that Bond is supposed to be an international business man ("Universal Exports" and all); second, I agree that Tom Ford looks showier than Brioni, at least on screen; and third, the effect of having a new suit on in every scene is probably quite large and contributes immensely to the perception of Brosnan and Craig.
  • Andrew (Dirty Punker/Bond and Beyond) 9 December 2017 at 21:21 on Roger Moore: Blue Blazer BossOn top of all these variations, Moore wore a navy, single breasted, peak lapel one in this interview. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4N_7DDhWzs
  • jojo 9 December 2017 at 02:03 on Tan Cotton Safari Sports Coat in The Spy Who Loved MeHi Matt, thanks again for a wonderful blog. Here in the UK, as a form of tribute, the Moore Bond films are being played one each night. As aspects such as gadgets age with time one of the more enduring features of the films are the suits and outfits, many of which shame present day examples. I think it worth mentioning that, of all the Bonds, Moore looked best in a suit - he seemed to have proportions that show the clothing at its best but without it taking over - it is always seen as an adjunct to the character rather than an overwhelming aspect. Moore always seemed to move with an unmatched elegance, Connery and Lazenby were athletic but Moore projects an almost meditative quality. On safari jackets it is probably worth mentioning the heritage - that they evolved from British military field jackets lightened by using different forms of woolen cloth. Thanks again.
  • Matt Spaiser 8 December 2017 at 22:40 on A Wardrobe of Frank Foster ShirtsThe collar space is approximately 1 cm. The new collar is a little taller is slightly taller in addition to having longer points.
  • svb 8 December 2017 at 22:25 on A Wardrobe of Frank Foster ShirtsAny idea how much tie space they are giving you in the collar? Also, was it odd that when you requested a taller collar, they responded by lengthening the collar point rather than increasing the band height? Were you given any insight as to one versus the other? Or were longer collar points actually what you meant in the first place?
  • Andrew (Dirty Punker/Bond and Beyond) 8 December 2017 at 18:42 on James Bond Black Tie Illustrations by Pat CarbajalThe likeness is astonishing but Connery looks blue-er than usual and he's not wearing his Sub. Yet, Moore and Craig were knocked out of the park. My compliments to the artist!
  • Matt Spaiser 8 December 2017 at 04:47 on Commander of the Cloth, Part 4: Daniel CraigIf the cloth is the problem here, perhaps the cloth is too lightweight and fine (like a 7.5 oz Super 180s) to be able to tailor well. These super luxurious cloths are very difficult to tailor. But lots of makers don't know how to cut a good suit, and this is only partially due to modern trends. Some of these makers might use brand-name cloths. If the fit is a little off but the cut is good, a suit can often be altered. If the suit follows your measurements but is poorly cut, nothing can be done. I brought a pair of trousers with a poor cut to my tailor to see if he could fix it, but he could not. He said because the cut was poor, nothing could be done. It took us a little time to figure out that the poor cut was due to a curved waistband, which has now become a trend.