Navy Overcoat in Saint Petersburg

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Navy Overcoat GoldenEye

Bond arrives in Saint Petersburg, Russia in GoldenEye wearing a navy overcoat—probably made by Brioni—over his charcoal windowpane suit. The full-length overcoat buttons three, with buttonholes visible on the front. The buttons are fairly low on the front, which isn’t very practical for an overcoat designed to keep someone warm. But since Bond wears the coat open he clearly isn’t too cold. The coat has a deep vent, flapped pockets and 3 buttons on the cuffs. Bond also wears dark brown leather gloves with the overcoat.

12 COMMENTS

  1. Whoa! That’s low fastening even for 1995. If he had at least worn a scarf… but then, I think showing his coat open was meant to make him look “too cool for warmth”? Or something.

    • It’s not necessary for gloves and shoes to match. Black leather gloves can make one look a bit like a burglar or assassin. Yes, Bond is an assassin, but that’s not Bond’s image. Still, black gloves aren’t necessarily bad. And it’s possible that the gloves could be black and my screen is deceiving me.

      • Just watched this in HD on my AppleTV and to me the gloves look black (as they do not contrast much with the black Walther PPK he holds).

        Also the suits looks mid grey, not charcoal in the St. Petersburg scenes.

        S

      • The cloth has varying tones of grey and other colours that make it’s appearance change more in different lighting, but overall it’s more charcoal than anything. Charcoal isn’t necessarily a very dark grey. It looks like I saw more contrast in the gloves than you did when holding the PPK. The contrast there is why I didn’t think the gloves were black.

      • Also in the following scene where Bond hands Wade a wrench when the car has broken down, the gloves really look black to me.

        On another topic, in this interview (http://www.piercebrosnan.com/menu.php?mm=8&sm=17&pn=2) Brosnan states that:

        Q:
        Do you ever keep anything from your movies?
        A:
        Yes, like a pair of church shoes I wore in all the Bond films!”

        Do you know which pair that is? Would be fun to know…

        S

  2. A favourite of mine since seeing it back in 1995. I always wished I looked that cool in airports in my years of international business travel. But it was not that easy with laptop bags and trolley suitcases. Perhaps I was not that far at Belgrade Airport in a similar charcoal outfit but that is another story…
    What is interesting is to compare that suit to the similar situation of 007 landing at JFK in 1972/1973 : English tailoring vs. Italian, 70s vs. 90s…
    As for warmth, it is no issue: 007 is in a single breasted suit with neither waistcoat nor other coat on the next day (the very nice birdseye navy suit). The same “next day climate change” happens in the next film in Hamburg with a 3-piece suit with an even warmer DB overcoat at the airport and a mere single breasted suit the next day.
    To conclude, with regards to gloves and shoes, on a 1995 Church’s commercial of Pierce Brosnan in the tank scene, the Westbury brogues looked dark brown to me IIRC.
    Regards from France

  3. This is a very nice overcoat and Brosnan is a beautiful dresser but he seems to have a liking for leaving his coats and in some cases jackets open which, for me, lessens the impact of the piece of clothing in question. As well as this, he leaves the double breasted blazer in this same movie and the overcoat in “Tomorrow Never Dies” flapping in the breeze. I think this was a fashion thing. A kind of conscious stylistic decision to not appear too “buttoned up” while at the same time being immaculately tailored. It’s a pity Hemming and Brioni wouldn’t return to the fold even if I agree with the recent debate that some classic British tailoring wouldn’t go amiss. There wouldn’t be the need to produce so many suits (seemingly the crux of the issue) if the character wasn’t so hyperactive! Four versions of the silk “Moonraker” suit were produced and this wasn’t a task beyond an Italian tailoring house in the late 1970’s.

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