Air Force Blue Blazer for Summer in “Vendetta for the Saint”

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Blazers do not always need to be navy. Other shades of medium to dark blue can work just as well in summertime for a blazer, such as Air Force blue. Air Force blue is a medium form of azure—a colour halfway between blue and cyan—and can be described as a warm blue-grey. Air Force blue became known as such when uniforms of surplus material in this colour were issued to the Royal Air Force. True Air Force blue is a medium shade, but shades of warm blue-grey that are a little darker than medium are still given the moniker. For people with a light, warm complexion like Roger Moore, Air Force blue is especially flattering. For people with a cooler complexion like Sean Connery, a cooler blue-grey will be more flattering for a similar effect to Air Force Blue.

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In a two-part 1969 episode of The Saint titled “Vendetta for the Saint”, which was also released as a feature film with the same title, Roger Moore wears an Air Force blue blazer from his tailor Cyril Castle made of a cool-wearing open-weave worsted wool when in Naples and Palermo in Italy. The episode was filmed partially on location, but with nearby Malta standing in for Italy. These sunny mediterranean locales are the perfect places to wear an Air Force blue blazer. Moore’s blazer is technically slightly darker than Air Force blue, but it is still close enough that it deserves the name. “Vendetta for the Saint” features Bond-film actors George Pastell and Steven Berkoff.

Roger Moore’s blue blazer in “Vendetta for the Saint” has three buttons on the front, a single button on the cuff, gauntlet (turnback) cuffs, slanted pockets with narrow flaps and double vents. The buttons are shanked and crested silver-toned metal. The blazer is cut with wide soft shoulders, roped sleeve heads, a draped chest and a suppressed waist. A low button stance, along with the drape, provides Roger Moore with a more masculine physique. The combination of soft shoulders, drape and a low button stance also gives this blazer the relaxed look that it needs for southern Italy. The blazer’s drape and wide shoulders when combined with narrow lapels give Moore a strong, imposing chest, but this look lacks a certain elegance.

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Moore wears two different pairs of trousers with this blazer: one pair in charcoal worsted and another pair in medium grey worsted. The charcoal trousers are darker than the blazer whilst the medium grey trousers are slightly lighter, and both trousers provide adequate contrast. Both pairs of trosuers have front darts, frogmouth pockets in front, two button-through pockets in the rear and tapered legs with plain hems. The trousers have belt loops, usually filled with a black leather belt. Many trousers colours would look great with this blazer, such as light grey, fawn, tan, khaki and cream.

There are continuity errors with the trousers. Moore wears the medium grey trousers on location when entering and exiting a bank, but the interior scene is filmed at Elstree Studios in England, and Moore wears charcoal trousers in that scene. Additionally, in some shots the belt is absent from the medium grey trousers.

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The cream shirt that Moore wears in “Vendetta for the Saint” is unique amongst the shirts that Moore wears in The Saint. His typical shirt in The Saint’s sixth series production (of which this episode is a part) has a tall classic spread collar, a plain front and two-button cocktail cuffs. Frank Foster made those shirts and he made the shirt in “Vendetta for the Saint” too. This shirt again has a tall collar, but it’s a wider cutaway collar with considerable tie space instead that makes the collar band visible beside the tie knot. It’s a shame Moore doesn’t often wear these wider collars because they balance his angular jaw. This shirt has a raised unfused placket with stitching about 3/8” from the edge. The cuffs are the first appearance of Foster’s single-button-fastening button-down cocktail cuffs, which Moore would wear a few years later throughout The Persuaders and Sean Connery would wear over a decade later in Never Say Never Again. “Vendetta for the Saint” is the only appearance of button-down cocktail cuffs in The Saint. The back of the shirt has small shoulder pleats and darts at the waist.

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Notice the button-down cocktail cuffs

Moore wears two similar narrow ties with this jacket, which both have wide light blue and navy stripes separated by narrow stripes. The narrow stripes are gold on the first tie and burgundy on the second tie. These ties both have square ends rather than the typical triangular ends, which was a fashion trend of the 1960s. Only a knitted tie traditionally takes a square end. The narrow ties knot with a small four-in-hand knot. Moore’s shoes are black calf slip-ons with a high vamp, low sides and black rubber soles. Brown shoes with the medium grey trousers would have been a better choice considering the location and casual nature of the outfit. Black shoes, on the other hand, are always a better match with charcoal trousers.

For the second half of the episode, Moore exchanges his blazer for a navy Harrington jacket (see below). He wears the Harrington jacket with the same charcoal trousers, burgundy-striped tie, shirt and shoes that he wears with the blazer.

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A Harrington jacket in Vendetta for the Saint

The Saint: A Blue Tweed Jacket

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For the first color series production of The Saint, Roger Moore takes full advantage of the color and wears a steel blue tweed sports coat made by his usual tailor Cyril Castle. Moore first wears this jacket in the fifth series episode “The Man Who Liked Lions” and later during the fifth series in “The Persistent Patriots” and “The Fast Women”. He wears it in two sixth series episodes, “The Fiction Makers” and “The House on Dragon’s Rock” that were actually part of the fifth series production. It is worn the most in “The House on Dragon’s Rock”, and the outfit Moore wears with it is what is featured in this article. The episode first aired on 24 November 1968.

Moore’s tweed is woven in a twill weave with a blue ground and has white flecks. It looks similar to a donegal tweed, but donegal is woven in a plain weave rather than a twill. Blue tweeds are somewhat unorthodox, being a country cloth in a city colour. Tweeds are traditionally in earthy colours—the brown and green families—or in neutral greys. Because a blue tweed jacket is an anomaly, a blue tweed jacket must be worn carefully. In the country, it should be avoided in autumn when browns completely dominate nature. In the country in winter it can fit in with the snow so long as the blue is muted. In spring, however, any blue can look good anywhere. Though tweeds aren’t traditionally worn in the city, a blue tweed jacket is a solid choice for casual wear amongst the concrete and steel.

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This jacket is Moore’s only jacket with two buttons in the entire run of The Saint, apart from an unfortunate ivory dinner jacket with two buttons that he wears in the early episodes of the series. Compared to his typical button three jackets from The Saint, this button two jacket makes Moore look less top-heavy and more balanced. The jacket is cut with a swelled chest and a closely nipped waist for an athletic look. The shoulders are lightly padded with roped sleeve heads, but the shoulders look more built-up than they are due to the heavy tweed. The jacket is detailed with double vents, single-button gauntlet (turnback) cuffs and straight flap pockets with a ticket pocket. The jacket has swelled edges on the lapels, the collar, the front edge, the pocket welt and flaps and the gauntlet cuffs. The jacket’s buttons are black horn, though brown horn would have been a more fitting choice due to the rustic look and warm tones Moore wears with the jacket.

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A close look at both sides of the jacket’s gauntlet cuffs—or turn back cuffs—from “The House on Dragon’s Rock”. The gauntlet cuff is a separate piece attached to the cuff.

In “The House on Dragon’s Rock”, Moore wears this jacket with medium grey flannel trousers that have a darted front, frogmouth pockets and straight legs. In some other episodes he wears tan twill trousers with this jacket, and almost any neutral trousers can pair well with a steel blue jacket. All shades of grey can work, from a light ash to a deep charcoal. Though black trousers won’t clash with this jacket, they will make the blue pop in a bold way, whilst charcoal trousers will give a similar look that is softer and more elegant. Anything in the brown family can work, from a light beige to a dark chocolate. Though cream and white trousers wouldn’t necessarily go with a cool-weather tweed jacket, they would be perfect with a steel blue linen or silk jacket in warm weather. Olive trousers, though often considered neutral, don’t work so well with a blue jacket. As triadic colours, blue and olive compete with each other when there are large amounts of both colours.

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Moore’s ecru shirt has a moderate spread collar, plain front and double cuffs. The narrow tie has wide brick red and grey stripes separated by narrow black stripes in the classic British direction, and it is tied in a four-in-hand knot. Moore’s shoes are dark brown short chelsea boots.

The Saint: A Black-and-White Hopsack Suit with a Double-Breasted Waistcoat

Roger Moore in "Simon and Delilah", with Lois Maxwell who plays Miss Moneypenny in the first 14 Bond films

Roger Moore in “Simon and Delilah”, with Lois Maxwell who plays Miss Moneypenny in the first 14 Bond films

In a number of fifth series episodes of The Saint—including “The Helpful Pirate”, “The Convenient Monster”, “The Angel’s Eye”, “The Persistent Patriots”, “Simon and Delilah” and “A Double in Diamonds”—Roger Moore wears a black and white hopsack three-piece suit. The overall look of the cloth is a medium-dark grey with a lot of sheen. The sheen suggests a wool and mohair blend, which was very popular in the 1960s. Mohair often came in these tone-tone hopsack weaves in the 1960s because the iridescent two-tone look accentuates the natural sheen of mohair. Hopsack—a basketweave—is also a popular weave for mohair because the open weave takes advantage of mohair’s cool-wearing properties.

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With a tie-clip microphone in “Simon and Delilah”

Cyril Castle, who tailored Moore for The Saint, The Persuaders, Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun, cut this suit. Like all of Roger Moore’s suits in The Saint‘s fifth series, this suit’s jacket has a button three front. The jacket is cut with softly padded shoulders, roped sleeve heads, a draped chest and a suppressed waist. A low button stance serves, along with the drape, to make Roger Moore’s chest look more masculine and imposing. The considerably narrow lapels add to this effect and make the entire look overdone.

For a dressier look, this suit jacket has the minimalist touches of jetted pockets and no rear vent. Like on most of the jackets in the fifth series, the cuffs are gauntlet cuffs with a single button. The suits’s trousers have a darted front, no belt, frogmouth pockets and narrow, tapered legs with plain hems.

Moore reaches into the pockets of his double-breasted in "The Angels Eye"

Moore reaches into the pockets of his double-breasted in “The Angels Eye”

The double-breasted waistcoat has six buttons in a keystone formation with three to button. A double-breasted waistcoat is an unusual piece and is more formal than a single-breasted waistcoat. It’s perfect for evening formal dress and morning dress, but it’s equally appropriate on a dressier lounge suit such as this shiny mohair suit. It’s certainly a dandyish piece and serves as a way to stand out from the crowd, but it doesn’t draw much more attention than a single-breasted waistcoat would, especially if the jacket is kept buttoned. It lends a rather old-world look to this suit, but since the suit is very modern with narrow lapels and narrow trousers it doesn’t have enough weight to make the suit look old-fashioned.

Notice the gauntlet cuffs, in "SImon and Delilah"

Notice the gauntlet cuffs, in “SImon and Delilah”

A suit like this is too bold for standard business dress. Mohair is too shiny and thus flashy, and the double-breasted waistcoat is too unconventional. These elements also make the suit too formal for the office. However, it is perfect for a fancy evening out or to wear to a day or night wedding, either as a guest or as the groom. Though mohair is a cool-wearing cloth and good for warm weather, the extra layer of a waistcoat gives this suit a wider temperature range.

Moore coordinates this suit with two different tie and shoe combinations. The shirts are always ecru, and many or all have white hairlines stripes. The shirts have a moderate spread collar, plain front and double cuffs. The collar has a tall stand but short points. In “The Helpful Pirate”, “The Convenient Monster” and “The Angel’s Eye” Moore wears a narrow medium grey satin tie and black slip-on shoes with elastic. In “The Persistent Patriots”, “Simon and Delilah” and “A Double in Diamonds” he wears an narrow olive satin tie and medium brown slip-on shoes with elastic. Moore knots his ties with a small four-in-hand knot.

The suit jacket buttoned in "The Convenient Monster"

The suit jacket buttoned in “The Convenient Monster”. With the jacket buttoned the double-breasted waistcoat doesn’t look so unusual.

In “Simon and Delilah” Moore wears a tie clip with a microphone built in (pictured second from top). A tie clip is typically unnecessary with a waistcoat because the waistcoat keeps the tie in place. Sometimes the waistcoat doesn’t do this job as well as it should and a man may still want a tie clip to keep his tie perfectly in place. In that case, the tie clip should be worn under the waistcoat. It belongs approximately three-quarters of the way down the tie and away from the face. Of course, a microphone would be less effective under the waistcoat. Ideally a two-piece suit should have been chosen for this scene. On the other hand, the waistcoat means that the tine clip is higher and thus in better sight for the viewers of the show.

Though he usually wears dark grey socks with this suit, in “The Persistent Patriots” Moore wears this suit with beige socks—which coordinate with the shirt more than they do with the suit. Though they by no means clash with the outfit, light-coloured socks can draw attention to the feet when attention should be drawn to the face.

Beige socks with this suit in "The Persistent Patriots"

Beige socks with this suit in “The Persistent Patriots”

Mainly Millicent: Roger Moore’s First Appearance as James Bond

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In an episode of the BBC sketch comedy show Mainly Millicent from July 1964, Roger Moore played James Bond nine years before he officially played the role in Live and Let Die. Mainly Millicent starred English actress Millicent Martin, and in this sketch she plays Russian spy Sonia Sekova on holiday. James Bond is also on holiday and is dressed down in a light grey tweed sports coat with a small, subtle check. The sketch can be found on the Live and Let Die DVD and Blu-ray disc as well as on YouTube.

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In this sketch Roger Moore’s James Bond outfit is almost identical to his Simon Templar outfits. Access to Moore’s wardrobe for The Saint wouldn’t have been difficult since both The Saint and Mainly Millicent were filmed at ATV’s Elstree studios (http://www.tvstudiohistory.co.uk/studio%20history.htm), which are in Hertfordshire just outside of London. Moore actually first wears this sports coat in The Saint’s second series episode “The Work of Art” in 1963. In a January 1964 episode titled “Luella”, Simon Templar convinces a woman that he is James Bond, and he is wearing this sports coat. That episode also features Moore’s Live and Let Die co-star David Hedison. This grey tweed jacket made it into the colour episodes five years later, and I previously wrote about how Moore dresses it down in the episode “The Death Game”. See it in colour!

The same grey tweed jacket in "The Death Game"

The same grey tweed jacket in “The Death Game”

Cyril Castle made this jacket in the usual button three single-breasted style he made for Moore throughout the 1960s. The cuts of the suit jackets and sports coats vary a little in the shoulders and chest, depending on how dressy they are. This is one of the least dressy sports coats and thus has natural shoulders without roping and has more drape in the chest. The waist is cut closely in the back, though from the front it looks a little shapeless. Interestingly, the quarters are cut more square and not as rounded as they ordinarily are on Cyril Castle’s jackets. This jacket is detailed with swelled edges, single-button cuffs, open square patch pockets with rounded corners, a welt breast pocket and short, six-inch double vents.

Like most of Moore’s jackets from The Saint, this jacket has very narrow lapels that aren’t all that flattering to Moore, especially due to the drape in the chest. The drape cut was developed in the 1930s when wide lapels were trendy and complemented the wide chest, so ultra-narrow lapels don’t go well with most of Moore’s jackets in The Saint. Despite the narrow lapels, Cyril Castle’s jackets are cut very well.

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In Mainly Milicent, Moore wears this jacket with dark trousers that are probably charcoal. They actually look black, but it is unlikely that they would be. They are cut with narrow, tapered legs. If they are like Moore’s other trousers from this era they have a darted front and frogmouth pockets. He wears his usual shirt from The Saint: ecru with a classic spread collar and double cuffs. The tie, however, is where Moore dresses more like James Bond than Simon Templar. Whilst Templar’s solid ties are satin silk and brightly-coloured, for his first appearance as James Bond he wears the classic Bond tie: a black knitted silk tie, tied in a four-in-hand knot. During a fight, Moore’s tie becomes dislodged from inside his jacket and hangs outside of it for the rest of the sketch, revealing the square bottom. Moore’s shoes are black and have very tall, two-inch “cuban” heels, which were made popular at the time by The Beatles. They’re the trendiest part of the outfit and certainly not something James Bond would wear, but they’re hardly seen.

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It’s not surprising that Moore wears his Saint wardrobe in this sketch, but the black knitted tie is the perfect touch. Someone on the staff for Mainly Millicent must have read Ian Fleming’s novels and knew that James Bond wears a black knitted tie. It was a simple way to dress Simon Templar more like Bond. Since this episode is from the summer of 1964, Goldfinger had not yet been released and that would be the first time the film Bond wears a knitted tie.

The grey tweed jacket in Luella in the scene where Bond whispers to a woman that he is James Bond

The same grey tweed jacket in the Saint episode “Luella” This is from the scene where Templar whispers to a woman that he is James Bond

The Saint: A Glen Urquhart Check Suit

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The Saint’s first episode “The Talented Husband”, which premiered a day before Dr. No on Thursday the 4th of October 1962, briefly introduces Roger Moore’s incarnation of Simon Templar quite similarly-dressed to Bond in a black shawl-collar dinner jacket. However, the first lounge suit Moore wears in this episode is a Glen Urquhart check suit, most likely in grey and cream but possibly in brown and cream. It has a light-coloured overcheck that is probably light blue, which would go well with either a grey or a brown check. The first lounge suit of the series established the generally pared-down look for Roger Moore’s tailored wardrobe in the show’s first four black-and-white series. All of Moore’s suits for The Saint were made by Cyril Castle of Conduit Street in London. Moore later wears this Glen Urquhart check suit in the first series episodes “The Loaded Tourist”, “The Element of Doubt”, “The Man Who Was Lucky” and “The Charitable Countess”, and in second series episodes as well.

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The suit jacket is cut with natural shoulders, roped sleeve heads, a full-cut—but clean—chest and a suppressed waist. A low button stance makes Roger Moore’s chest look more masculine and imposing, and narrow lapels add to this effect. The lapels are roughly the same width as Sean Connery’s lapels in his mid-1960s Bond films, but these lapels are the widest of all the suits’ lapels in The Saint. Most of Moore’s other suits’ lapels are a bit narrower and less flattering to Moore’s build.

The jacket is detailed with straight, flapped hip pockets, a flapped ticket pocket and three buttons on the cuffs. This jacket has one major difference from all of Moore’s other suit jackets in the black-and-white episodes of The Saint; whilst most of them have a single vent, this suit jacket has roughly 8-inch double vents. The buttons match the overall colour of the suit—either light grey or light brown—but the buttonholes contrast in a much darker colour. The suit’s trousers have a darted front and frogmouth pockets. The legs are full-cut through the thigh and tapered neatly to much narrower plain hems.

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With this suit Moore wears what is most likely a pale blue shirt, which would match the suit’s blue overcheck. If the shirt isn’t blue it would have to be ecru. It has a spread collar and rounded double cuffs. His narrow, medium-dark satin tie—which I guess is red—is tied in a small, asymmetrical four-in-hand knot. His shoes are light brown slip-ons, which are an appropriate match for this sporty suit. Moore wears a straight-folded white linen handkerchief in his suit jacket’s breast pocket.

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This episode features the Bond girl actress Shirley Eaton, who, two years later, would go on to play her most famous role: the gold-painted Jill Masterson in Goldfinger. She gives a solid performance with Moore for a great start to the seven years of The Saint.

Crossplot: A Double-Breasted Pinstripe Suit from The Saint

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Roger Moore’s 1969 film Crossplot is like a cross between an episode of The Saint and a James Bond film. Moore plays talent scout Gary Fenn, who is identical in appearance to The Saint character Simon Templar except he has a more fashionable haircut that’s combed forward with longer sideburns. The Cyril Castle suits—an iridescent blue and red dinner jacket, a navy pinstripe double-breasted suit and a charcoal multi-stripe suit—and shirts in the film were taken straight out of Moore’s wardrobe for the final season of The Saint, which had just ended production.

The same suit in the episode of The Saint "The Scales of Justice"

The same suit and shirt, but with a grey tie, in the episode of The Saint “The Scales of Justice”

The navy double-breasted pinstripe suit, which this article will focus on, first appeared in The Saint‘s sixth series episode “The Time to Die” and later in “The Scales of Justice”. The suit’s cloth has very closely-spaced white pinstripes on navy, which from a short distance mixes with and mutes the navy to give the suit a semi-solid charcoal blue effect rather than a classic navy pinstripe look. Suits with closely-spaced pinstripes were something Roger Moore wears throughout The Saint and later wears in Moonraker.

Crossplot-Navy-Pinstripe-Suit-2The suit jacket is four-button double-breasted with two to button. It is similar to the classic six button double-breasted jacket but lacks the two vestigial buttons at the chest. Like Cyril Castle’s usual double-breasted suits, this one has a narrow wrap—or overlap—for a slimming effect on Moore. It is cut with natural shoulders and a full chest. It has narrow peaked lapels, which aren’t quite as narrow as the notched lapels Moore wears on his single-breasted suits in Crossplot and The Saint. The narrow peaked lapels are a little more flattering than his ultra-narrow notched lapels. The suit jacket is rakishly detailed with single-button gauntlet—or turnback—cuffs, slanted hip pockets with narrow flaps, and double vents. The suit trousers have a darted front, cross pockets and a tapered narrow leg, and they are worn with a black belt.

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Moore’s cream shirt is made by Bond-series shirtmaker Frank Foster in the same style as all of the shirts that Moore wears in the final series of The Saint. The shirt’s spread collar is larger in proportion to the tie and lapel width. Fashion typically dictates that shirt collar point length and tie and lapel width should match, but it’s usually more flattering to wear a collar that matches the face rather than the jacket’s lapels. The shirt has two-button cocktail cuffs, a plain front and a darted back. The shirt length is short compared to the traditional length of a tucked shirt, but in Frank Foster’s typical manner the shirt’s hem is only slightly curved and has vents on the side.

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The secretary ties Moore’s tie in a four-in-hand knot around her own neck, loosens it and then places it around Moore’s neck. It is solid light blue, and unstylishly Moore wears a matching light blue silk handkerchief in his breast pocket. But it is placed in the pocket in an unstudied two-point fold. It look as if he just stuffed it in his breast pocket and the two points formed naturally, but that is most likely not the case. Moore wears black socks, and his shoes are black slip-ons.

Crossplot-Navy-Pinstripe-Suit-BoxersSince we get to see Roger Moore dress into the suit, we get a look at parts of his outfit under the suit we don’t ordinarily get to see. Though we never get to see what James Bond wears under his trousers, Roger Moore’s underwear in Crossplot may give us a clue. When he changes his trousers we see his boxer shorts. They are light blue—perhaps purposely matching his tie—and probably a fine cotton poplin, which is one of the most comfortable types of woven cloths to wear as boxers.

Crossplot-Navy-Pinstripe-Suit-ShowerUnfortunately, the suit is ruined and shrunk in Crossplot when Moore is pushed off a boat into the water. Because of he is a gentleman, he leaves his suit, shirt and tie on when taking a shower to warm up when in the company of a lady.

For an additional James Bond connection, Bernard Lee, who plays M in the first 11 Bond films, appears in Crossplot.

The Saint: A Classic Safari Jacket

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Roger Moore wore the safari jacket before he was James Bond and before the late 1960s when Yves Saint Laurent and Ted Lapidus made it a fashion item. In the 1965 episode of The Saint titled “The Sign of the Claw”, Moore wears a mostly traditional British safari jacket, which is probably in the classic khaki. The episode takes place in the Malayan jungle, where the tropical climate and British colonial history makes the safari jacket an entirely appropriate piece of clothing.

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Moore wears a leather utility belt over the safari jacket’s belt.

The safari jacket has four buttons down the front plus a button at the collar. The shirt-style, two-piece point collar is stitched close to the edge. The front of the jacket has four button-down-flapped patch pockets. The upper two pockets each have a box pleat in the middle, and the lower two pockets each have bellows for extra usability. Though the jacket is slightly shaped with a dart on either side in the front, a belt made of the same cloth as the jacket cinches the waist. The belt has a shiny metal two-prong buckle. The jacket’s long sleeves have square-cornered button cuffs. The back has a long, deep inverted box pleat from the bottom of the yoke to the belt, and a long single vent from the belt to the hem. Of course, the jacket wouldn’t be a proper safari jacket without the obligatory shoulder straps.

Saint-Safari-Jacket-BackThough this safari jacket closely follows the traditional model, it breaks from tradition in one area. Instead of begin made from military cotton drill, this jacket is likely made from a linen and silk blend. It looks softer and lighter than cotton drill, it has a few slubs and it shows some wrinkles. Though the cloth may not be typical for a safari jacket, the jacket is still more classic compared to the slightly more modern safari clothes that Roger Moore wears in The Man with the Golden Gun, The Spy Who Loved Me, Moonraker and Octopussy.

The trousers possibly match the jacket, but since this episode is black and white, the match is difficult to make out. Under the jacket’s collar, Moore wears a silk day cravat, which is probably cream. It is not a practical item, but Moore plays a gentleman who almost always keeps his neck covered. Moore’s shoes are taupe suede 2-eyelet desert boots. At one point in the episode, Moore wears a dark leather utility belt over the jacket’s belt.

For some James Bond-related trivia, this episode features Burt Kwouk, who was in Goldfinger and You Only Live Twice.

The Saint: Dressing Down the Navy Blazer

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Compared to most sports coats, which are at home in the country, the navy blazer is better suited at seaside and resort towns. However, the single-breasted navy blazer is one of the most versatile sports coats, and due to its solid navy colour it can just as effectively be dressed up in the city as it can be dressed down at a resort. Roger Moore playing Simon Templar shows a great example of the latter when he wears his blazer in the 1965 episode of The Saint titled “The Spanish Cow”.

Casual-Navy-Blazer-2In the first through fourth series of The Saint from 1962 to 1965, Moore often wears a button three, wool navy blazer with straight flapped pockets, a ticket pocket, three buttons on the cuffs and a single vent. Tailor Cyril Castle made no less than two examples of such a blazer made since it saw more wear than any other item of clothing in the show. The blazer in “The Spanish Cow” isn’t much different than the blazer that Moore wears in the first episode of The Saint three years earlier in 1962, except the cloth is lighter, the shoulders are softer and the lapels are just a little narrower. The fashionably narrow lapels, however, look disproportionately narrow and are somewhat unflattering on Moore.

Casual-Navy-Blazer-3So how does Moore dress down his navy blazer? Underneath the blazer he wears a light-coloured camp shirt with a straight, untucked hem. The shirt has a one-piece camp collar that stands up nicely inside the blazer’s collar, which is the key to successfully wearing any shirt other than a formal shirt under a jacket (unless you like to wear t-shirts under your jackets). And because the shirt has a camp collar and not a more formal collar, Moore doesn’t have to worry about people thinking he forgot his tie. In the 1960s, wearing a formal shirt without a tie wasn’t done. It wasn’t something that James Bond ever did in the 60s, unless you count Sean Connery’s pink shirt in You Only Live Twice. Simon Templar rarely did it. Moore’s trousers are stone-coloured cotton and have either a flat front or darted front and a plain hem. He wears canvas slip-on shoes with white rubber soles, and he matches his white socks to the soles of his shoes. Essentially, Moore put his tailored blazer on top of a very casual outfit, and it works successfully. The blazer’s soft, natural shoulders help it to work better when worn casually.

Simon Templar mentions the name of his shirtmaker in a conversation with the “South of France” police chief Colonel Latignant—a recurring character played by Arnold Diamond—when Latignant comments on the shirts in Templar’s suitcase:

Templar: And how is the most efficient chief of police in the South of France?

Latignant: That depends.

Templar: Oh—on what?

Latignant: On your behaviour in the South of France.

Templar: My behaviour everywhere is impeccable.

Latignant: So is your taste in shirts. These are magnificent.

Templar: Sulka makes them for me in London.

Colonel Latignant (Arnold Diamond) holding one of Moore's Sulka shirts

Colonel Latignant (Arnold Diamond) holding one of Simon Templar’s Sulka shirts